SOLICITORS’ INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP

 

HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS AFFECTING LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER AND INTERSEXUAL (LGBTI) PEOPLE IN EL SALVADOR

 

By Gillian Melville, Alexandra Mostaza Scallon and David Palmer.

 

Submitted on behalf of the Solicitors’ International Human Rights Group (SIHRG).

 

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

The purpose of this report is to build on and highlight the widespread and systematic human rights violations currently taking place against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersexual (LGBTI) individuals in El Salvador.

 

In particular, this report draws attention to the following main points:

 

. Individuals in El Salvador are subject to discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation and |or gender identity by both State and non-State actors, including in access to healthcare, employment, benefits, and education services.

 

. Though inadequate reporting makes exact numbers uncertain, it is clear that there are persistent violations of the right to life of LGBTI persons in El Salvador on the basis of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Due to the persistence of stereotypes and prejudices regarding the role of women in society, lesbians and transgender women are particularly at risk.

 

. El Salvador is failing to adequately prevent, investigate, report, and | or to prosecute incidents of gender-based violence and killings, including against LGBTI individuals.

 

. LGBTI persons suffer cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment, including: a constant threat of violence that amounts to torture; sexual violence in detention centres; and violence at the hands of the police.

 

. The El Salvador State refuses to recognize the gender-based crime as a separate category of hate-motivated killings.

 

. El Salvador does not take action to prevent negative stereotyping of the LGBTI community from being promoted through the media.

 

. By denying transgender individuals appropriate identity documents, El Salvador does not recognize or respect gender identity of transgender persons.
It is submitted that this situation amounts to breaches of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR),

 

1 The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR),

 

2 The American Convention on Human Rights,

 

3 the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment (CAT),

 

4 the Inter-American Convention to Prevent and Punish Torture,

 

5 the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW),6 the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women (Convention of Belém do Pará)7 and the Principles and Best Practices on the Protection of Persons Deprived of Liberty in the Americas.

 

1 Ratified by El Salvador on 30 November 1979.

 

2 Ratified by El Salvador on 30 November 1979.

 

3 Ratified by El Salvador on 20 June 1978.

 

4 Acceded to by El Salvador on 17 June 1966.

 

5 Ratified by El Salvador on 17 October 1994.

 

6 Ratified by El Salvador on 13 November 1995.

 

7 Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women,

 

8 Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos “Entre Amigos” (Salvadorean Human Rights Association, “Between Friends”), International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC), Global Rights, International Human Rights Clinic of the Harvard Law School (HLS) Human Rights Program, y Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Personas Trans (Red LACTRANS, Latin American and Caribbean Network of Trans Persons). The Violation of the Rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Persons in El Salvador (2010) Shadow Report submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Committee 10 August 2010, available at: http://www.iglhrc.org/cgi-bin/iowa/article/publications/reportsandpublications/1217.html, last accessed 12th June 2013.

 

9 University of Berkeley, California (2012) Sexual Diversity in El Salvador a report on the human rights situation of the LGBT Community July 2012, available at: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/LGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf last accessed 12th June 2013.

 

10 Discriminatory laws and practices and acts of violence against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity. Report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011, UN Doc. A/HRC/19/41, para 20.

 

11 Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos “Entre Amigos” (Salvadorean Human Rights Association,

 

“Between Friends”), International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC), Global Rights, International Human

 

Rights Clinic of the Harvard Law School (HLS) Human Rights Program, y Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Personas Trans

 

(Red LACTRANS, Latin American and Caribbean Network of Trans Persons). The Violation of the Rights of Lesbian, Gay,

 

Bisexual and Transgender Persons in El Salvador (2010) Shadow Report submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Committee 10 August 2010, available at:

 

http://www.iglhrc.org/cgi-bin/iowa/article/publications/reportsandpublications/1217.html, last accessed 12th June2013.

 

2. INTRODUCTION

 

The purpose of this report is to provide up to date information on the current situation facing the LGBTI Community in El Salvador. This report builds on the previous shadow report submitted by Entre Amigos et al8 and also draws on a subsequent report produced by the International Human Rights Clinic in Berkeley University, California in July 2012.9

 

This report comes at a time when on the one hand the international community has started to put LGBTI rights at the forefront of the international agenda, whilst on the other, violations of international standards are still being reported across all regions.10

 

A shadow report was submitted in 2010 by Entre Amigos et al,11 highlighting that in the sixth periodic report that was submitted by the State, through which it had the opportunity to provide details of its compliance with the ICCPR, it completely failed to mention the LGBTI community. This was despite the fact that the UN Human Rights Committee had, in its concluding observations on the Third, Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports on El Salvador, expressed its concern at the number of incidents of people being attacked and even killed on account of their sexual orientation, and at the small number of investigations into such illegal acts.12

 

12 Ibid. p. 3

 

13 UNSW Law available at: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/news/2012/10/international-anti-homophobia-legal-clinic-el-salvador-seeks-legal-advocates, last accessed 20 July 2013.

 

14 Ibid.

 

15 See report ´La Alianza por la Diversidad Sexual LGBT de El Salvador ‘a report on the aggression suffered by LGBT community in El Salvador between Jan–Sept 2009.

 

16 Concluding observations of the Human Rights Committee 18 November 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, p.3

 

17 The Yogyakarta Principles: The Application of International Human Rights Law in relation to Sexual Orientation
and Gender Identity at 6 FN 1 (March 2007) available at http://www.yogyakartaprinciples.org/principles_en.htm

 

Since the shadow report by Entre Amigos was submitted in 2010, extra-judicial killings and other atrocities against LGBTI persons in El Salvador continue (See section below regarding the Right to Life). By most accounts there have been more than 47 murders of gay men, transsexuals & transvestites since the shadow report was submitted.13 It has also been reported that in relation to all of these murders, no one has been brought to justice.14 Many other LGBTI individuals are regularly assaulted, battered, threatened and shunned.15

 

It is submitted that these attacks constitute a form of gender-based violence, driven by a desire to punish those seen as defying gender norms. In its concluding observations in 2010, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed its concern about the persistence of stereotypes and prejudices regarding the role of women in society in El Salvador and called for El Salvador to design and implement programmes aimed at eliminating gender stereotypes, including the establishment of statistical system that could provide disaggregated data on gender violence.16

 

It is further submitted that these gender stereotypes persist to this day and this severely impacts on the rights of the LGBTI community. Furthermore, the failure by the State to recognise the specific nature of LGBTI motivated violence and consequently to produce any statistics around LGBTI violence permits the authorities to ignore, and misrepresent homophobic and transphobic abuse.

 

3. DEFIINING LGBTI: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

 

Sexual orientation refers to “each person’s capacity for profound emotional, affectionate and sexual attraction to, and intimate and sexual relations with, individuals of a different gender or the same gender or more than one gender.” This term includes lesbian, gay, bisexual, or heterosexual (straight) orientations.17

 

Gender identity refers to “[E]ach person’s deeply felt internal and individual experience of gender, which may or may not correspond with the sex assigned at birth, including the personal sense of the body (which may involve, if freely chosen, modification of bodily appearance or function by medical, surgical or other means) and other expressions of gender, including dress, speech and mannerisms.” The external manifestation of a person’s gender identity is called gender expression. Gender expression usually involves “masculine,” “feminine,” or gender-variant behaviour.

 

18 The Gay & Lesbian Alliance against Defamation (GLAAD), Media Reference Guide 7 (8th Edition, May 2010).

 

19 Ibid. at 8.

 

20 Ibid. at 9.

 

21 Ibid. at 9.

 

22 General Assembly’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/, last accessed 4 August 2013.

 

23 See The right to Equality and Non-Discrimination, Icelandic Human Rights Centre, at http://www.humanrights.is/thehumanrightsproject/humanrightscasesandmaterials/humanrightsconceptsideasandfora/substantivehumanrights/therighttoequalityandnondiscrimination/, last accessed on 4 August 2013.

 

24 General Comment 20 of the UN Economic and Social Council, Non-discrimination in economic, social and cultural rights (art. 2, para. 2, of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights) UN Doc E/C.12/GC/20, para. 32.

 

Transgender people generally seek to make their gender expression match their gender identity, rather than their sex at birth.19 In other words, a person whose sex at birth is determined to be male, but who has an internal sense of being a female, is a transgender woman. Transgender is therefore a term used for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression and their sex at birth do not match. This term may include transsexuals, cross-dressers, and other gender-variant people. Altering one’s birth sex is not a simple or short process, but rather a process that occurs over a long period of time known as a “transition.”20

Steps that may be, but are not always included in transitions are: informing one’s family and friends, changing ones name and/or sex on legal documents, undergoing hormone therapy, and medical treatment, often including surgery.21

 

Human rights instruments prohibit discrimination on several grounds. Article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)22 prohibits discrimination on the following 10 grounds: race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth and other status. The same prohibited grounds are included in Article 2 ICESCR and Article 2 ICCPR. It is important to note that the grounds contained in these provisions are not exhaustive and the term ‘other status’ has an open-ended meaning. This means that some grounds which are not explicitly mentioned, such as age, gender, disability, nationality and sexual orientation could also be considered prohibited grounds.23 In its General Comment of 2 July 2009, the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights observed that “other status” included sexual orientation: “State’s parties should ensure that a person’s sexual orientation is not a barrier to realising the Covenant’s on Economic, Cultural and Social rights, for example, in accessing survivor’s pension rights. In addition, gender identity is recognized as among the prohibited grounds of discrimination.”24

 

In the same General Comment the Committee also referred to the Yogyakarta Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (hereinafter referred to as ‘the Principles’) as a source of guidance on definitions of “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”.25 The Principles, which are non-binding were developed by human rights experts and have been used by several UN entities.

 

25 Ibid.

 

26 See US State Department (2012) El Salvador 2012 Crime and Safety Report available at: https://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=12336
, last accessed 20 July 2013, p.3.

 

27 US State Department Human Rights Report 2011 regarding El Salvador, available at http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/2011/wha/186513.htm, p.22.

 

28 Toonen v. Australia, CCPR/C/50/D/488/1992, UN Human Rights Committee (HRC), 4 April 1994, paras 8.6, 8.7 and 11.

 

29 Constitution of El Salvador, available at: http://confinder.richmond.edu/admin/docs/ElSalvador1983English.pdf

 

4. BACKGROUND:

 

4.1 Pattern of discrimination and generalized violence against LGBT community

 

El Salvador, a country of roughly six million people, has hundreds of known street gangs totalling more than 20,000 members. Violent, well-armed, U.S.-style street gang growth continues in El Salvador, with Los Angeles’ 18th Street and MS-13 (“Mara Salvatrucha”) gangs being the largest in the country. 26

 

Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is widespread and transgender persons are also the subject of discriminatory behaviour.27 There is also widespread official and societal discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, access to health care and access to identity documents, all of which this report will address in more detail later.

 

Discrimination towards LGBTI persons in El Salvador creates a climate where violence, torture and ill-treatment towards the LGBTI community is tolerated and accepted. It also provides a climate where individuals can be denied access to a range of services including employment, housing and health care.

 

Articles 2(1) and 26 of the ICCPR provide for the respect, equality, and non-discrimination of all individuals on the grounds of, inter alia, race, colour, and sex. In the landmark decision of Toonen v Australia in 1994, the Committee found not only that the reference to “sex” in Articles 2(1) and 26 must be taken to include sexual orientation, but also that laws which criminalise consensual homosexual acts expressly violate the privacy protections of Article 17.28

 

Article 1 of the El Salvador Constitution provides that: “El Salvador recognises the individual as the source and object of the activity of the State, which is organized for the attainment of justice, legal security and the common good. It also recognises every human being as a human person from the moment of conception. Accordingly, the State has an obligation to guarantee the inhabitants of the Republic the enjoyment of liberty, health, culture, economic well-being and social justice.”29

 

Article 3 of the Constitution of the Republic of El Salvador states that:

 

“All persons are equal before the law. No restrictions based on differences of nationality, race, sex or religion can be placed for the enjoyment of civil rights. No hereditary employment or privileges are recognized.”30

 

30 Ibid.

 

31 La Pagina 2 December 2012, Present Studies of Human Rights of gay Community in El Salvador, available at: http://www.lapagina.com.sv/nacionales/74663/2012/12/02/Presentan-estudios-sobre-derechos-humanos-de-comunidad-gay-en-El-Salvador, last accessed 16 April 2013.

 

32 (n9) Sexual Diversity in El Salvador a report on the human rights situation of the LGBT Community July 2012, pp. 14 to 16.

 

33 (n 31).

34 See the concluding observations of the Human Rights Committee on El Salvador, 18 November 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, para. 3 c.

 

35 US State Department Country reports for Human Rights practices 2012, El Salvador, available at: http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/#wrapper, last accessed 4 August 2013.

 

36 Ibid. Section 6, Under the heading, Discrimination, Societal Abuses, and Trafficking in Persons.

 

However, research published in 2012 indicates that El Salvador is far from guaranteeing basic rights for non-heterosexuals, such as access to education, health, housing and full professional development without discrimination.31

 

Among the major issues in El Salvador are hate crimes against people who are “sexually diverse”, and the denial of education for transgender and transsexual individuals. 32 Researchers have also found a negative media, which “continues to reinforce stigma” against these groups. 33

 

The UN Human Rights Committee has urged State parties to “guarantee equal rights to all individuals, as established in the ICCPR, regardless of their sexual orientation” and has specifically called on El Salvador to enact laws prohibiting discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation.34

 

The US State Department has stated in its 2012 report on El Salvador35 that, although the constitution and the legal code of El Salvador provide that all persons are equal before the law and prohibit discrimination regardless of race, gender, disability, language, or social status, in practice the government did not effectively enforce these prohibitions. Instead, it reported discrimination against several groups including women, persons with disabilities, LGBTI persons; and indigenous people, although it was recognized that the Secretary of Social Inclusion (SIS), headed by First Lady Vanda Pignato, had made efforts to overcome traditional bias in all these areas.36.

 

4.2 Legal protections afforded to LGBTI community since 2010, and a lacking of effective implementation As previously mentioned, the Constitution of El Salvador and its criminal laws do not explicitly prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. However, in 2010, El Salvador did adopt Agreement No. 202 in order to eradicate all forms of discrimination based on sexual orientation in public health services. It also adopted Presidential Decree No. 56 on 4 May 2010, the purpose of which was to prevent discrimination based on gender identity and/or sexual orientation in the civil service, and created the Sexual Diversity Division under the Social Inclusion Secretary. However, despite this, acts of violence and discrimination against the LGBTI population in El Salvador continue and the available evidence suggests that discrimination towards LGBTI individuals by State employees is still a serious problem. Moreover, a Decree is not akin to new legislation and is instead dependent on the political will of the government. Therefore if a new government is elected there is no guarantee that the incoming government will keep the Decree. In addition, the Decree only applies within the public administration and also lacks teeth as it does not carry any enforcement mechanism.

 

In its 2012 Report on Human Rights in El Salvador, the US State Department reported that:

 

“… significant discrimination against transgender persons. There was widespread official and societal discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment and access to health care and identity documents. The NGO Entre Amigos reported that public officials, including the police, engaged in violence and discrimination against sexual minorities. Persons from the LGBT community stated that the agencies in charge of processing identification documents, the PNC (National Civilian Police) and OAG (Office of the Attorney General), ridiculed them when they applied for identification cards or reported cases of violence against LGBT persons. The government responded to these abuses primarily through PDDH (Ombudsman for Human Rights) reports that publicized specific cases of violence and discrimination against sexual minorities.” 37

 

37 (n 35) section 6, under the heading ‘Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity.’

 

38 (n 31).

 

39 (n 31).

 

40 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 14.

 

This situation is found in many other countries in the region. Ortega Ariñez Carlos Castel, a Nicaraguan researcher has stressed that progress in each country is different. Although there have been important developments in El Salvador, these have not been effective in enforcing legal standards for the benefit of the LGBTI community, nor is there a media awareness of the situation.38

 

In 2012, an independent investigation into the situation in El Salvador was conducted by El Centro de Estudios Internacionales (CEI) and the Asociación COMCAVIS Trans. The investigation lasted six months, during which time volunteers from El Salvador gathered information and analysed various laws, the constitution, and international treaties of the UN and the OAS (Organisation of American States). Newspaper content was also analysed from the preceding 10 years. This research showed that news involving LGBTI people is generally sensationalist, and tended to disguise hate crimes as crimes of passion.39

 

Indeed, this climate towards LGBTI individuals in El Salvador continues to perpetuate discrimination towards the LGBTI community at the hands of both State and non-State actors, often manifesting itself through violence.

 

4.3 Violence by non-state actors: Gangs

 

LGBTI activists report criminal gangs have been linked to violence against LGBTI individuals.40 In particular, an inability or unwillingness to “pay rent” (a fee extracted by gangs for use of certain areas of the streets) can result in violence for sex workers and their families.41

 

Fransheska, a transgender activist and sex worker, was shot four times in 2006 after she refused to “pay rent.”42

 

41 Ibid.

 

42 Ibid.

 

43 See generally No Place to Hide:Gang, State, and Clandestine Violence in El Salvador, International Human Rights Clinic, Harvard Rights Program, Harvard Law School, 2007, available at: http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/hrp/documents/FinalElSalvadorReport(3-6-07).pdf, last accessed 4 August 2013.

 

44 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 14.

 

45 See Harvard Law School, The Violation of the Rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Persons in El Salvador (2010), available at: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/docs/ngo/LGBT_Shadow_Report_El_Salvador_HRC100.pdf, p.8.

 

46 Marielos Olivo, Diagnostico para la construcción de políticas públicas inclusivas, diversas y respetuosas de los derechos humanos de las personas con orientación e identidad sexual diversa [Diagnostic for the construction of inclusive and diverse public policies respectful of the human rights of persons with a diverse sexual orientation and identity], Coordinación LGBT. El Salvador 2007, at 16.

 

47 (n 27), p. 22.

 

48 Interview with Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana (with Sayuri and Alejandra), Director, COMCAVIS-TRANS, in San Salvador, El Salv. (Feb. 22, 2011); reference taken from (n9), Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report p. 15.

 

49 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 15.

 

Salvadoran gangs have evolved into sophisticated organised crime networks, capable of terrorising entire communities and manipulating the justice system.43 Anti-gang policies, in turn, have generated their own set of human rights concerns resulting from the unprecedented granting of power to the national police, and the erosion of fundamental legal protections.

 

A 2010 Anti-Gang Law made it a criminal offence to belong to a gang or contribute to gang finances. However, this also made it illegal to pay extortion fees and made this punishable by up to six years in prison. The law has therefore had the unintended effect of leaving private citizens vulnerable to violence if they fail to comply with gang demands but subject to criminal sanctions if they give in to gang extortion.44

 

A 2010 Harvard Law School report states that gangs often require new recruits to attack members of the LGBTI community as part of their initiation process.45 Daisy, a transgender woman, reported being taken away by men in a car after which she was beaten and raped before her captors left her on the street.46

 

4.4 Violence by state actors: Police

 

Entre Amigos reports that public officials, including the police, regularly engage in violence and discrimination against sexual minorities.47 LGBTI activists reported that police have sexually assaulted and raped members of the LGBTI community.48 A report released by LGBTI advocates in El Salvador documented one particularly harrowing incident where eight National Civilian Police (PNC) officers approached and interrogated a gay man then forced him into a patrol car and took him to another location, where they raped him.49

 

The government responded to these abuses primarily via reports of the Office of the Ombudsman for Human Rights (PDDH) that publicised specific cases of violence and discrimination against sexual minorities. However, on the 13th May 2011, the Secretary of Social Inclusion (SIS)’s Office of Sexual Diversity also announced an awareness campaign and training on LGBTI rights50 for which hundreds of government employees attended.51 In addition, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) and other organisations (including SIS) provided human rights training for approximately 4,700 police officers.52

 

50 (n, 27), p. 22.

 

51 (n 27), p. 6.

 

52 Ibid.

 

53 (n 27), p. 22.

 

54 Ibid.

 

55 (n 35), under heading ‘Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity’.

 

Despite these positive measures, the PDDH in El Salvador still received complaints about the killing of 13 persons from the LGBTI community during the first half of 2011, compared with only two during 2010.53 It is not known to the authors to what extent this figure has risen due to people feeling more confident in reporting such crimes, or whether this demonstrates that violence against the LGBTI community is rising. Whichever is the case, the number is still unacceptable.

 

On 18 September 2011, the Solidarity Association to Promote Human Development of Transsexual, Transgender, and Transvestite Men and Women stated that as at September that year, the media reported 17 killings; 23 cases of police mistreatment; and injuries to 13 individuals, three allegedly injured by police. They also reported six “hate crimes” and four attacks on LGBTI persons.54

 

In 2012, according to the US State Department, the PDDH investigated eight cases of possible human rights violations committed against LGBTI persons, two of which involved abuses committed by the PNC, although the PDDH did not receive any reports of killings of LGBTI persons.

 

On 1 February 2012, police officers allegedly verbally and physically abused a 17-year-old gay adolescent, whom they forced to get off a bus and walk several blocks while they physically and verbally abused him. According to the victim’s testimony, the police officers then made a telephone call, and three gang members subsequently appeared and beat the victim until he lost consciousness. It is reported that this matter is being investigated. 55

 

In May 2013 The organisation, “Asociación COMVAVIS Trans de El Salvador” issued a notification highlighting abuses to LGBTI women at the Sensuntepeque prison in Cabañas. It explained how transsexual and transgender women with HIV-AIDS and gay people continue to be abused by prison guards who, withhold legal aid, subject the prisoners to degrading “punishments” such as: forcing prisoners to carry out 500 push-ups, exposing their knees for over two hours in the sun, deficient food, refusal of medical attention and even verbal and physical abuses. In addition, trans prisoners have been barred entry to prison workshops and are regularly threatened and abused.56

 

56 Notification “Asociación COMCAVIS Trans El Salvador” May 2013, p. 1.

 

57 ALDES (2012) Presentation on Extra-legal killings of LGBT Persons in El Salvador.

 

58 Ibid.

 

59 Available at: http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session7/SV/FMDVP_UPR_SLV_S07_2010_FundacionMundialDejameVivirenPaz.pdf last accessed 20 July 2013.

60 El Mundo 16 May 2013, available at: last accessed 20 July 2013. http://elmundo.com.sv/denuncian-repunte-de-ataques-contra-comunidad-lgbtiand www.elsalvador.com

 

61 Statement by COMCAVIS Trans.

 

Whilst the government has implemented various measures in order to tackle widespread discrimination and LGBTI targeted violence, any practical positive effect of these measures has yet to be discerned. This is likely to be due to deeply entrenched views about the LGBTI community in El Salvadorian society, reinforced by the negative stereotyping of the LGBTI community by the media.

 

5. THE VIOLATION OF LGBTI PEOPLES’ RIGHT TO LIFE

 

Article 6 of the ICCPR and Article 4 of the American Convention on Human Rights guarantees the right to life and provides that no person should be arbitrarily deprived of his or her life.

 

There have been 128 documented extra-legal killings of LGBTI persons in El Salvador and in the vast majority of such cases there has been no effective investigation and nobody has been brought to justice.57 Asistencia Legal Para la Diversidad Sexual (ALDES) states there were 3 reported killings of LGBTI individuals in 2007, 11 in 2008, 23 in 2009, 10 in 2010 and 17 in 2011. According to Gays Sin Fronteras there were 7 gay men murdered in El Salvador in 2012. Once again, in the vast majority of these cases there has not been an effective investigation and the perpetrators have not been brought to justice.58

 

La Fundación Mundial Déjame Vivir en Paz (Global “Let Me Live in Peace” Foundation) (FMDVP) recently reported the murders of at least 12 members of the LGBTI community in El Salvador, the result of escalating violence against the homosexual community.59 Moreover, in 2013 five transgender women and two gay men (who had not made their sexuality public) have been killed. There were also seven transgender women murdered in the country in 2012.60

 

In April 2013, a report was received from the NGO COMCAVIS Trans regarding the killing of a 17 year old, transsexual woman named Perla in La Herradura, La Paz. The most recent victim at the time of writing is Tania Vásquez. Ms. Vásquez was murdered in a hate crime in May 2013. She was a transgender woman, human rights defender and Trans activist aged 25, who was also on the board of COMCAVIS Trans.61

 

It is very likely that the official data does not reflect the actual number of LGBTI individuals who have been murdered in El Salvador, where the victim’s sexual orientation or gender identity was not accurately recorded at the time. The situation in El Salvador may be similar to that in Guatemala, where the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions reported with regard to his mission to Guatemala in 2007 that, “Given the lack of official statistics and the likely reticence if not ignorance of the victims’ family members, there is reason to believe that the actual number [of murders of LGBTI people] are significantly higher.”62

 

62 Report of the Special Rapporteur on Extra-legal, Arbitrary and Summary Executions on his mission to Guatemala 21-25 August 2006, UN Doc A/HRC/4/20/Add.2, para 32.

 

63 Concluding observations of the UN Human Rights Committee regarding El Salvador 22 July 2003, UN Doc CCPR/CO/78/SLV, para 16.

 

64 Concluding observations of the UN Human Rights Committee regarding El Salvador, 18 November 2010, UN Doc. CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6 paras 5, 6, 8 and 9.

 

65 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 14.

 

66 Statement by COMCAVIS Trans.

 

67 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p.14.

 

The concluding observations of the UN Human Rights Committee in 2003, included “concern at the incidents of people being attacked, or even killed in El Salvador, on account of their sexual orientation and at the small number of investigations mounted into such illegal acts.”63 This situation appears to still exist today.

 

It is worth noting that although the UN Human Rights Committee report on its concluding observations relating to El Salvador in 2010 did not mention crimes against LGBTI individuals in particular, it does make reference to the lack of investigations of crimes of the past, to allegations of torture and ill-treatment by the police and violence, including murders of women.64

 

Even after extensive media coverage of the criticism by the UN of the government’s failure to hold perpetrators accountable for these crimes, the brutal murders of multiple transgender women in 2009 remain uninvestigated. For example in February 2011, Rianna, a transgender woman, was gang raped and killed. There was no mention of her murder in the Salvadoran press and no one has been held accountable for her death.65 More recently, as it is understood at the time of writing, the murder of Tania Vásquez in May 2013, is yet to be properly investigated.66

 

Furthermore, Entre Amigos, the leading LGBTI advocacy organisation in the country, has stated that in many of these cases the bodies of the victims revealed signs of torture, including dismemberment, stabbings, beatings, and multiple gunshots. 67

 

6. VIOLATION OF THE PROHIBITION OF TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT

 

Articles 7, 9 and 10(1) of the ICCPR recognise the right of every individual to be free from torture; arbitrary arrest; and cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment or punishment. In its General Comments on Article 7, the UN Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) has noted that States have a positive obligation to afford everyone protection through legislative and other measures as may be required, against torturous acts whether inflicted by people acting in their official capacity, outside their official capacity or in a private capacity.

 

68 The time and place of all interrogations must be recorded, together with the names of all those present, and this information should be available for purposes of judicial or administrative proceedings.

 

68 CCPR General Comment No. 20. Available at: http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/6924291970754969c12563ed004c8ae5?Opendocument, para 2.

 

69 Ibid. para 11.

 

70 CCPR General Comment No. 21 concerning humane treatment of persons deprived of their liberty, available at: http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf(symbol)3327552b9511fb98c12563ed004cbe59?Opendocument para 4.

 

71 (n9) Berkeley Report p. 15.

 

72 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic available Report, pp. 15 -16.

 

73 Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Rashida Manjoo follow up mission to el Salvador 17-19 March 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/17/26/Add.2, p. 9.

 

Through its General Comments on Article 10, the UNHRC has stated that “treating all persons deprived of their liberty with humanity and with respect for their dignity is a fundamental and universally applicable rule… [which] must be applied without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.”70

 

The Berkeley report contains descriptions of abuses that have reportedly occurred within law enforcement facilities. One advocate reports that the PNC places transgender and lesbian women in the same cell as male detainees and this has resulted in women being raped while in the cell.71 Moreover, NGOs have received reports of officers from both the PNC and CAM (Cuerpos de Agentes Metropolitanos – Metropolitan Police Forces present in some larger cities) raping and abusing lesbians and transgender women whilst in prison.72

 

The following case study from El Salvador illustrates some of the issues mentioned in the preceding paragraphs: Paula’s story (assumed name) illustrates the level of violence endured by the lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual and intersex communities in El Salvador. Paula was brutally attacked and shot by a group of men when she was leaving a nightclub in San Salvador. While in hospital, she faced harsh treatment and disdain from health-care personnel because she was transgender and HIV-positive. A few months after leaving hospital, she was detained and put in a male prison for two years for attempted homicide, although she claimed to have acted in self-defence. Paula was released after the man she had attacked admitted that this was the case. In prison, she was put in a cell with members of gangs (Mara) and was raped more than 100 times, sometimes with the complicity of prison officials. Upon her release from jail, she was again attacked by Mara members who found out that she was HIV-positive and that some of those that had raped her in jail had been infected.73

 

6.1 Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

 

There are continuing examples of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. The Special Rapporteur on violence against women recently reported alleged incidents of gang rapes; family violence and murder experienced by lesbian, bisexual and transgender women in El Salvador.74

 

74 Ibid. paras. 28-29.

 

75 Discriminatory laws and practices and acts of violence against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, para 34.

 

76 A/56/156, para. 19. See also E/CN.4/2001/66/Add.2, para. 199, E/CN.4/2002/76, annex III, p. 11, and E/CN.4/2005/62/Add.1, paras. 1019 and 1161.

 

77 Concluding observations of the Human Rights Committee, 18 November 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, para 8.

 

78 See http://www.glaad.org/search/site/conversion%20therapy?retain-filters=1for further information, last accessed 28 August 2013.

 

79 Available at: http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html last accessed 20 July 2013.

 

The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has reported in November 201175 that the Special Rapporteur on Torture has noted that in the country:

 

“Members of sexual minorities are disproportionately subjected to torture and other forms of ill-treatment because they fail to conform to socially constructed gender expectations, and that “discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity may often contribute to the process of the dehumanization of the victim, which is often a necessary condition for torture and ill-treatment to take place.”

 

Moreover the Rapporteur has also stated that States generally do not take sufficient measures to prevent such acts.76

 

In the concluding remarks of the UN Human Rights Committee in 2010, it was stated that El Salvador should thoroughly investigate all human rights violations attributed to police officers, especially those involving torture and ill-treatment, identify and prosecute those responsible, and impose not only the relevant disciplinary sanctions, but also, where appropriate, criminal sanctions commensurate with the seriousness of the offence.77 However, where abuses by El Salvador State officials do occur, it appears that the perpetrators, as with extra-legal killings, are unlikely to be held to account.

 

The prohibition of torture relates not only to physical abuse but also to “acts that cause mental suffering to the victim,” including intimidation. In El Salvador, the transgender community lives under a constant threat of physical attack. The following is an account of this type of intimidation and mental suffering:

 

‘VR’: “When I came out…my parents as a last resort, sent me to a psychologist. I didn’t realize I was actually going to conversion therapy.78 When I started, she actually gave me pills, medication….of course I was never cured because I was never sick…but I had to live a parallel life; the life in front of my family and a hidden life as a lesbian… my dream for my own life is to live openly with my partner, my friends, my family at some point, without causing a problem by living openly as who I am, and to be able to feel like I’m living safely here, not because I have a soldier with a loaded gun behind me, which tends to be the image of peace that is propagated in El Salvador, but because I live a peaceful coexistence with the people in my society….”79

 


6.2 Rapes and Sexual assaults

 

Even though El Salvador witnessed a sharp decline in the number of reported rapes in 2011, it remains a serious and ever-present concern. There were 326 rapes reported to the National Civilian Police (PNC) in 2011, down from 681 in 2010. Local police and judicial experts estimate that less than 20 percent of rapes are reported to authorities.80

 

80 (n 26), p. 4.

 

81 Special Rapporteur on Torture report before the Human Rights Council, 15 January 2008, A/HRC/7/3, para 36

 

82 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 15.

 

83 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 15.

 

84 European Court of Human Rights, Aydin v. Turkey, Communication 23178/94, 25 September 1997.

 

85 European Court of Human Rights, Zontul v Greece, application no. 12294/07, 17 January 2012.

 

86 Martin de Mejía v Peru No 5/96 Annual Report of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, 1995, Case no. 10.970, Report 5/96 1 March 1996.

 

87 Ibid.

 

Rape is considered by courts as a grave violation of women’s’ integrity and therefore may amount to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. In this regard, the Special Rapporteur on Torture, Manfred Nowak, stated that: “It is widely recognised, including by former Special Rapporteurs on torture and by regional jurisprudence, that rape constitutes torture when it is carried out by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of public officials”.81

 

In El Salvador, lesbian and transgender women have been raped by police officers whilst in police custody.82 Moreover, because El Salvador houses lesbian and transgender women in men’s prisons and jails, they are at particularly high risk of sexual violence including rape.83 The serious nature of these crimes and the suffering caused is highlighted by the following jurisprudence.

 

The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held that the rape of persons in detention can amount to torture. The Court so held in the case of Aydin v Turkey, where a young woman was held in detention by police and stripped of her clothes, beaten, sprayed with cold water from high pressure jets, blindfolded and raped.84 More recently in 2012, the ECtHR noted in the case of Zontul v Greece, that the victim had been the subject of forced penetration, which had caused him acute physical pain. The Court reiterated that the rape of a detainee by an official of the State was to be considered as an especially grave and abhorrent form of ill-treatment. The ECtHR held that the treatment to which Mr Zontul had been subjected, in view of its cruelty and its intentional nature, had unquestionably amounted to an act of torture.85

 

Moreover, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has classified rape as torture in the case of Martin de Mejía v Peru.86 This was based at least in part due to the physical and mental suffering that was inflicted as a form of violence to punish and intimidate the victim.87

 


6.3 Right to Liberty and Security of Person

 

Documented incidents of arbitrary arrest in El Salvador including of LGBTI individuals constitute violations of article 9(1) of the ICCPR and article 7(3) of the American Convention on Human Rights. In El Salvador police have tried to extort sexual favours from the LGBTI community and LGBTI sex workers are subjected to particular harassment.88 A young gay man, Carlos, reported how a PNC officer pulled him over as he was driving with friends, and made derogatory remarks about their sexual orientation. The officer proceeded to search the car and demanded money. When Carlos refused, the officer threatened to arrest him, and then stated: “If you give me oral sex, I will let you go.”89

 

88 (n9) p. 15.

 

89 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 15.

 

90 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Transgénero, Transexuales, Travestis e Intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 29.

 

91 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 17.

 

92 (n 75), Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011 paras 63 and 84 (h).

 

93 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 26.

 

During 2010, the Directorate on Sexual Diversity within the Secretariat of Social Inclusion was established, together with the passing of Presidential Decree number 56.90 However, again, it is noted from the University of Berkeley report published in July 2012, that there is under reporting of crimes by the LGBTI community. It is likely that due to under reporting and a lack of investigations, that the climate of impunity is still very much present for all crimes and particularly those where members of the LGBTI community are victims.91

 

7. IDENTITY DOCUMENTS

 

In many countries, transgender persons are unable to obtain legal recognition of their preferred gender, including a change in recorded sex and first name on State-issued identity documents. As a result, they encounter many practical difficulties, including when applying for employment, housing, bank credit or State benefits, or when travelling abroad. The UN Human Rights Committee has therefore urged States to recognise the right of transgender persons to change their gender by permitting the issuance of new birth certificates and has noted with approval legislation facilitating legal recognition of a change of gender.92
Transgender persons in El Salvador have difficulty in legally changing their gender in official identity papers. In El Salvador, having a Salvadoran identity document is critical to navigate around many aspects of Salvadoran society. However, transgender individuals are not legally entitled to change their name or gender identity.93 This severely impacts on their access to employment opportunities. In addition, whilst the identification document has space for an
alternative name, transgender people have reported that they have been denied the use of this feature to record their true gender identities.94

 

94 Interview with Karla Stephanie Avelar Oellana with Suyuri and Alejandra of COMCAVIS TRANS in Sexual Diversity in El Salvador: a report on the human rights situation of the LGBT community” July 2012, Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic available at http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/LGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf, last accessed 15 April 2013, p. 44.

 

95 Report on Human Rights of Trans Women in El Salvador, April 2012, UN Development Program pp. 11 and 12

 

96 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Transgénero, Transexuales, Travestis e Intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 27.

 

In the absence of an institution responsible for integrating and systematising all statistical information on gender-based violence, several institutions, including the Institute of Forensic Medicine, the Institute for the Advancement of Women and Office of the Procurator-General, gather their own statistics using different methodologies and categorisations of forms of gender-based violence. The existence of multiple, divergent statistics often leads to data fragmentation and duplication and therefore to misleading information.

 

The following data highlight the problems transgender persons have regarding their identity:

 

89% of trans women identify with a female name.

 

42% say they have had problems or inconveniences changing their names.

 

70% have difficulties in processing their documents before the State.

 

44.8% have difficulties requesting a name change.

 

19.3% of the population of El Salvador agrees that trans women have a right to ID documents identifying them as women.

 

84.6% of civil servants in El Salvador don’t consider gender identity to be a condition requiring treatment or needing to be “corrected” and support reforms to the legal system to identify the gender of trans women.95

 

8. DISCRIMINATION

 

In addition to the violation of their civil and political rights, the LGBTI community in El Salvador is also subjected to discrimination of their economic, social and cultural rights. This includes discrimination by private actors. For example, certain private companies do not provide services or sell their goods or services to LGBTI persons as a result of their sexual orientation.96

 

Other ways in which the economic, social and cultural rights of the LGBTI community are infringed are discussed in the following sections.

 

8.1 Discrimination in Employment

 

Under international human rights law, States are obligated to protect individuals from any discrimination in access to and maintenance of employment.
The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has confirmed that the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) “prohibits discrimination in access to and maintenance of employment on grounds of sexual orientation”.97 According to the Committee, “any discrimination in access to the labour market or to means and entitlements for obtaining employment constitutes a violation of the Covenant.”98

 

97 Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights general comment No. 18 (E/C.12/GC/18), para. 12 (b)(i).

 

98 Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights general comment No. 18 (E/C.12/GC/18), para.

 

12 (b)(i). See also the concluding observations of the Human Rights Committee on the United States of America (CCPR/C/USA/CO/3/Rev.1), para 33.

 

99 State-sponsored homophobia: a world survey of laws criminalising same-sex sexual acts between consenting adults, International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Association (ILGA), Brussels, May 2011, pages 12-13.

 

100 X v. Colombia (CCPR/C/89/D/1361/2005), paras. 7.2-7.3; Young v. Australia (CCPR/C/78/D/941/2000), paras. 10-12.

 

101 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 41.

 

102 Interview with Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana with Suyuri and Alejandra of COMCAVIS TRANS in Sexual Diversity in El Salvador: a report on the human rights situation of the LGBT community” July 2012, Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic available at

 

http://www.law.berkeley.edufilesLGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf , last accessed 15 April 2013, p. 42.

 

103 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 42.

 

Fifty-four States have laws prohibiting discrimination in employment based on sexual orientation.99 In the absence of such laws, employers may be able to fire or refuse to hire or promote people simply because they are thought to be homosexual or transgender.

 

Importantly, benefits that accrue to heterosexual employees may be denied to their LGBTI counterparts – from parental or family leave to participation in pension and health-care insurance schemes. In X v. Colombia and Young v. Australia, the UN Human Rights Committee found that failure to provide pension benefits to an unmarried same-sex partner, when such benefits were granted to unmarried heterosexual couples, was a violation of rights guaranteed by the ICCPR.100

Whilst in El Salvador Presidential Decree 56 prohibits employment based discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation in the public sector, there is no such legislative or constitutional provision in respect of employment in the private sector, and advocates have reported that employers freely discriminate against LGBTI people in the private sector.101

 

The lack of access to employment opportunities, and open discrimination results in a disproportionate number of people from the LGBTI community, particularly transsexual females, becoming sex workers, leaving them vulnerable to violence and disproportionately increasing their chances of HIV infection.102 This creates a vicious circle where LGBTI people are often perceived as more likely to have HIV, and are therefore discriminated against on the grounds of their perceived HIV status.103

 

In El Salvador, LGBTI persons have to often act in a certain way in order to not be exposed to discrimination. It has been stated that lesbian women often claim to suffer sexual harassment by their superiors if they are discovered and are sometimes subjected to “conversion rape”. Moreover, LGBTI employees also report that their sexual orientation is a factor in them being exploited at work, with threats that they will be exposed should they not agree to overtime.104

 

104 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Transgénero, Transexuales, Travestis e Intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 26.

 

105 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 41

 

106 (n 75), Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011, para 58.

 

107 Ibid.

 

108 Report of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Education, 23 July 2010, UN Doc A/65/16 para 23.

 

109 Article 13 (2) (a).

 

110 Article 13 (2) (b and c).

 

111 Ratified by El Salvador on 10 July 1990.

 

112 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 4 (2003) Adolescent Health and Development in the Context of the Rights of the Child. UN Doc CRC/GC/2003/4, para 6.

 

8.2 Discrimination in Education

 

Article 58 of the El Salvador Constitution prescribes that “no educational facility can refuse to admit a student because of the nature of his parents or tutors’ union, nor for social, religious, racial or political differences”.105 The Constitution does not mention other grounds on the basis of which discrimination is forbidden, particularly sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression.

 

The OHCHR has stated that LGBTI youth frequently experience violence and harassment, including bullying, in school from classmates and teachers.106 Confronting this kind of prejudice and intimidation requires concerted efforts from school and education authorities and integration of principles of non-discrimination and diversity in school curricula and discourse. The media also have a role to play by eliminating negative stereotyping of LGBTI people, including in television programmes popular among young people. A related area of concern is sex education.107 The Special Rapporteur on the right to education noted that, “in order to be comprehensive, sexual education must pay special attention to diversity, since everyone has the right to deal with his or her own sexuality.”108

 

The right to education is enshrined in Article 13 of the International Covenant on Economic, Cultural and Social Rights (ICESCR)109 and specifically requires that states provide compulsory primary education, make secondary education generally available, and provide higher education that is “equally accessible to all.”110

 

Article 29 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child111 also makes provision regarding the education of children. The general comments of Committee on the Rights of the Child have included reference to discrimination:

 

“State parties have the obligation to ensure that all human beings below 18 enjoy all the rights set forth in the Convention without discrimination (art. 2), including with regard to “race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status”. These grounds also cover adolescents’ sexual orientation and health status (including HIV/AIDS and mental health).”112

 

The Protocol of San Salvador echoes the right to education and points to it as a means for all members of society to “achieve a decent existence.”113

 

113 Article 13(2).

 

114 (n9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 30.

 

115 Ibid.

 

116 Ibid.

 

117 LGBT Community Roundtable in San Salvador, (Feb 22, 2011) in (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 40.

 

118 Interview with Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana with Suyuri and Alejandra of COMCAVIS TRANS in (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 42.

 

Recent reports indicate that six people are infected with HIV every day in El Salvador. Although sexual education was taught in the public school system, the curriculum typically focuses on abstinence.114 While there have been several attempts to introduce a sexual education curriculum that discusses safer sex practices, advocates reported that schools generally have not introduced such programs. Moreover, education in public schools about sexual orientation and gender identity were nearly non-existent. A representative of one NGO attributed the failure of the State to adopt a more comprehensive approach to sex and reproductive rights education to the influence of the Catholic Church and other religious groups in Salvadoran society, which adopt a conservative stance on these topics.115 In addition, due to a combination of pressure from the Church and government bureaucracy, advocates reported a general lack of access to condoms and noted that local NGOs provided the majority of the condoms distributed to the public.116

 

Another activist reported that lesbian women, particularly those who are more masculine in appearance, suffer from similar forms of exclusion and discrimination. One medical student stated:

 

“If we change our appearance, we are more accepted…if not, they say ‘look here comes that ‘maricon’ [derogatory term for a gay man]….’’ – Sayuri, a transgender woman, who attended college by dressing as a man, which she described as a form of “significant discrimination.”117

 

Representatives of a civil society organisation identified transgender discrimination as a pressing issue in higher education. They stated that rather than endure discriminatory treatment or the degrading experience of “passing,” many LGBTI individuals abandon their studies.118

 

8.3 Discrimination in Healthcare

 

Article 2 of the Salvadoran Constitution guarantees citizens the right to life. A direct consequence of this guarantee is the right to health, which affirmatively obligates the state to provide adequate health care. Article 3 of the Constitution prohibits discrimination based on sex and holds all persons equal before the law. In addition, the Salvadoran Health Code prohibits discrimination in health care based on nationality, religion, race, political creed, or social status.

 

In March 2009, the Ministry of Health signed Ministerial Decree 202, which states that all public health services must facilitate and promote the eradication of discrimination based on sexual orientation. Decree 202 expressly prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation by
personnel working in public health care and calls for reporting regarding steps taken to reduce homophobia and discrimination in the health sector. Additionally, Presidential Decree 56 bans discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in government, including the health sector. Both decrees provide important protections, but only govern discrimination in the public sector.

 

The Partnership Framework Document to support Central American HIV/AIDS response between the government of the USA and Central America States, contends that the high levels of HIV/AIDS infection are at least in part due to discrimination and stigma in the health care systems in Central America. The report also argues that such issues need to be addressed by implementing laws and policies directly related to these issues.119

 

119 Partnership Framework Document to Support Implementation of the Central American HIV/AIDS Response Between the Government of the United States and the Governments of the Central American region (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. March 2010.

 

120 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, c p. 43.

 

121 The ILO Recommendation on HIV and AIDS and the world of work, 2010 (No. 200, at http://www.ilo.org/aids/WCMS_142706/lang-en/index.htm

 

122 Ibid at 10.

 

123 Ibid at 11.

 

124 Ibid at 37(d).

 

8.4 Discrimination against People Living with HIV/AIDS in Health Care

 

It is noted that the researchers for the Berkeley report also found that discrimination on the basis of HIV status is still prevalent in El Salvador. Despite legislation making it illegal for employers to force employees to submit to HIV testing, in practice, this still happens, with the main perpetrators being private employers requiring HIV testing as a prerequisite to commencing and/or continuing in employment. In addition, employees who request time off for medical appointments have been investigated by their employers and ultimately sacked for having HIV, or suspected of having HIV, status.120

 

The International Labour Organisation’s (ILO) recommendation on HIV and AIDS and the world of work, 2010 (No. 200)121 states that there should be no discrimination against or stigmatisation of workers, in particular job seekers and job applicants, on the grounds of real or perceived HIV status.122

 

It further stated that real or perceived HIV status should not be a cause for termination of employment and temporary absence from work because of illness or care giving duties related to HIV or AIDS. Such persons should be treated in the same way as absences for other health reasons.123

 

The ILO has also recommended that member states should ensure collaboration and coordination among the public authorities and public and private services concerned, including insurance and benefit programmes or other types of programmes,124

 

and should also promote social dialogue and other forms of cooperation amongst government authorities, public and private employers and workers and their representatives, whilst also taking into account the views of occupational health personnel, specialists in HIV and AIDS, and other parties.125

 

125 Ibid at 37(f).

 

126 UNGASS Report 2010.

 

127 Ibid.

 

128 Programa de la Nacionas Unidas Para el Desarrollo, El Salvador (PNUD) Annual Report Studying the Stigma and Discrimination of People with HIV in El Salvador in 2009.

 

In accordance with data filed by the Ministry of Health and Social Assistance, through the National HIV/AIDS Program, the Report on the Situation of HIV in El Salvador until November 2009 has reported that there have been 23,731 accumulated cases of HIV and AIDS since 1984. Of these, 15,087 (65.58%) have been identified as HIV cases and 8,644 (36.42%) as AIDS cases. Of these, 62.74% of those affected were men and 37.26% were women.126

 

The characteristics of the illness indicate that it is an epidemic which is concentrated in more vulnerable areas and affects predominantly males. It also affects mainly a younger population who is financially active and who tend to settle in largely urban areas. Since January 2004 and up until November 2009, the average annual rate of new cases of HIV was 1,443 new cases whilst the average annual rate of new cases of AIDS was 406. 127

 

With regards to actual HIV rates, the Annual Report Studying the Stigma and Discrimination of People with HIV in El Salvador in 2009, detailed the results of 688 questionnaires filled out by people with HIV from three different locations in El Salvador. Some relevant statistics include:

 

. 57.9% of respondents claimed they were unemployed.

 

. 47.4% of respondents live in poverty.

 

. 17% of respondents claimed to belong to a “sexual minority.”

 

The most negative reactions to knowledge of HIV came from families or neighbours or local community leaders:

 

. 48.4% of respondents from minority groups blame themselves for their condition.

 

. 35.8% of respondents from minority groups feel embarrassed.

 

. 33.6% of respondents from minority groups are scared of being harassed or verbally assaulted.128

 

This questionnaire highlights that HIV/AIDS disproportionately affects people from “sexual minorities” and the amount of shame and embarrassment they feel with regards to their condition.

 

9. EQUAL TREATMENT OF MEN AND WOMEN

 

In her report of 14 February 2011, the Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, its Causes and Consequences, stated that El Salvador continues “to face significant challenges in the area of violence against women and girls. Impunity for crimes, socio-economic disparities and the machista culture continue to foster a generalised state of violence, subjecting women to a continuum of multiple violent acts, including murder, rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment and commercial sexual exploitation.”129

 

129 Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Rashida Manjoo Follow-up mission to El Salvador 17 -19 March 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/17/26/Add.2 p.6 para 13.

 

130 UN Human Rights Council, summary of 9 stakeholders’ submissions to the Universal Periodic Review dated 25 November 2009, UN Doc A/HRC/WG.6/7/SLV/3. Summary of the submission by the Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defence of Women’s Rights CLADEM, para. 15.

 

131 Ibid.

 

132 Ibid.

 

133 Ibid.

 

In its first national report on the situation of violence against women, the National Institute for the Advancement of Women recognised that El Salvador had disregarded and undermined the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, rendering the suffering of women and the impunity that surrounds that violence almost invisible and underreported. The reasons behind such underreporting are manifold: family and community pressure not to reveal domestic problems; economic dependency; fear of retaliatory violence by partners; poor awareness of rights among victims; lack of sufficient support services; and low confidence in the justice system, mainly as a result of discriminatory responses and inconsistency in the application and interpretation of the law.

 

A recent statement made on 25 November 2009 by President Funes, (the President of El Salvador) during his speech marking the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, he announced the dismissal of any public official found to be involved in incidents of sexual harassment.
The Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defence of Women’s Rights (CLADEM) in El Salvador) states that, even though some progress has been made, such as the National Policy on Women and the Domestic Violence Act, a sexist view of women still predominates in El Salvador, seen most clearly in the deaths of women, which have not been accorded the importance they deserve.130 CLADEM recommend that a national mechanism for statistics on women’s deaths should be created to address this.131

 

PDDH, on the other hand, contends that the State has not adopted any effective measures to prevent and punish violence against women. From 2001 to May 2009, 2,660 murders of women were recorded, many of which remain under investigation and unpunished.132

 

PDDH also notes that between 2002 and 2008, there were 5,869 complaints regarding sexual assaults, 88 per cent of which were against female victims.133

10. LEGAL PERSONHOOD RIGHT TO PRIVACY

 

Articles 16 and 17 of the ICCPR recognise the rights to legal personhood and privacy respectively. Under Article 16,

 

everyone has the “the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.” Article 17(1) states that “no one shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to unlawful attacks on his honour and reputation.”

 

Article 17(2) further provides that “everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.”

 

By its General Comment 16 of 1988 the UN Committee on Human Rights has noted that Article 17 of the ICCPR affords protection to inter alia personal honour and reputation and that:

 

“[t]his right is required to be guaranteed against all such interferences and attacks whether they emanate from State authorities or from natural or legal persons. The obligations imposed by this article require the State to adopt legislative and other measures to give effect to the prohibition against such interferences and attacks as well as to the protection of this right”.134

 

134 Human Rights Committee, General Comment 16, (Twenty-third session, 1988), Compilation of General Comments and General Recommendations Adopted by Human Rights Treaty Bodies, U.N. Doc. HRI/GEN/1/Rev.1 at 21 (1994), para1.

 

135 Toonen v. Australia, CCPR/C/50/D/488/1992, UN Human Rights Committee (HRC), 4 April 1994, paras 8.2 and 11.

 

In the landmark decision of Toonen v Australia in 1994, the Committee found that laws that criminalise consensual homosexual acts expressly violate the privacy protections of Article 17.1 of the ICCPR.135

 

Read together, Articles 16 and 17 of the ICCPR create an obligation for States to recognise the self-identified gender of transgender persons.

 

All individuals in El Salvador are required to be registered for legal status. Legal status is treated as equivalent to legal personhood, and the State issues identity documents on this basis. However, because El Salvador refuses to recognise the self-identified gender of transgender persons, these individuals are often unable to obtain appropriate identity documents, effectively denying them status as a legal person as required under international law.

 

When a transgender individual lacks legal personality, she or he effectively becomes undocumented. This means that, for example, if a transgender woman is the victim of violence, the State may only document this violence under her legal, male birth name. This has the effect of keeping transgender women from accessing important services, such as assistance available for women through the social security system.

 

Because the physical appearance of transgender persons and their names rarely correspond with their identity documents, they are often turned away from service providers such as hospitals. As discussed previously at page 15, the Berkeley report confirms that transgender persons are unable to legally change their names or sex on national identity documents to reflect their gender identity.136

 

Moreover, the discrepancy between the photo on their identity card and their appearance also draws attention to their transgender identity. Once identified as a transgender individual, activists reported that these patients are then often left to wait for long periods or completely denied care.137

 

136 Interviews with members of advocacy groups and an LGBTI activist in (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p.26

 

137 Ibid.

 

138 Goodwin V United Kingdom, European Court of Human Rights Application no. 28957/95, 11 July 2002, para 77.

 

139 Goodwin V United Kingdom, European Court of Human Rights Application no. 28957/95, 11 July 2002.

 

140 (n 75), Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011 para 73.

 

Important jurisprudence from the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) provides guidance on the interpretation of these rights. In Goodwin v. United Kingdom, the EctHR recognised the difficulties caused by lack of gender recognition. The Court stated:

 

“The stress and alienation arising from a discordance between the position in society assumed by a post-operative transsexual and the status imposed by law which refuses to recognise the change of gender cannot, in the Court’s view, be regarded as a minor inconvenience arising from a formality. A conflict between social reality and law arises which places the transsexual in an anomalous position, in which he or she may experience feelings of vulnerability, humiliation and anxiety.138

 

The Court found the United Kingdom had violated the applicant’s right to privacy, by causing the applicant’s previous gender identity to be revealed in addition to breaching other rights including the right to marry.139 The applicant in Goodwin was a post-operative, male-to-female transgender individual, and much of the language of the Court’s decision specifies the relevance of the post-operative status.

 

The UN Human Rights Committee has also expressed concern regarding lack of arrangements for granting legal recognition of transgender peoples’ identities. It has urged States to recognise the right of transgender persons to change their gender by permitting the issuance of new birth certificates and has noted with approval legislation facilitating legal recognition of a change of gender.140

 

However, individuals in El Salvador have limited access to labour and healthcare resources, putting sexual reassignment surgery out of reach for most transgender persons. As such, the UN Human Rights Committee should consider taking guidance from and extending the ECtHR’s jurisprudence by recognising that there is a lack of legal personhood for transgender individuals in El Salvador, in violation of the State’s obligations under article 16 of the ICCPR, and that this exists irrespective as to whether the transgender individual has undergone gender reassignment surgery or not.

 

10.1 Concerns of transsexual women

 

As a result discussions with the transgender population in El Salvador regarding the 2015 UN Millennium Development Goals, organised by the United Nations Program for Development, a number of concerns were highlighted. These include:

 

. A law is required that will allow the transgender population to choose their sexuality;

 

. Transgender persons need access to education without being the subject of discrimination;

 

. There is a lack of access to employment for transgender persons in the public or private sectors, consequently most end up as hairdressers or sex workers;

 

. Transgender persons found there was a lack of access to justice and a need to improve security because they suffer from violation of their rights;

 

. Most importantly transgender persons want to be recognised. 141

 

141 Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarollo (2012) Women call for recognition of transsexual gender identity by the government and the population, available at: http://www.pnud.org.sv/2007/content/view/1500/, last accessed 27 July 2013.

 

142 Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Margaret Sekaggya, 20 December 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/16/44. Para 37.

 

143 Ibid, para 39.

 

144 Ibid. Para 39.

 

145 Ibid. Para 85.

 

10.2 Freedom of expression, association and assembly

 

Under article 19 of the ICCPR, “everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice.”
The human rights abuses with respect to LGBTI persons in El Salvador have been manifested in killings, assaults and discrimination in relation to basic services as described above.

 

On a more general level the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders in 2010 reveals that discrimination against LGBTI persons in this way is a worldwide problem and that a large number of communications relating to different States sent during the reporting period (totalling 196) concerned alleged violations against defenders, including males, working on women’s rights or gender issues, including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual cases.142

 

It was also noted that in the Americas, where 51 of the Special Rapporteur’s communications originated from, the communications related predominantly to threats, death threats, physical attacks, killings and attempted killings.143 [The] alleged perpetrators were largely reported to be unknown or unidentified individuals, occasionally armed, often with reported links to non-State actors, including paramilitaries.144

 

The personal reputations of defenders who support rights related to gender and sexuality have been challenged and maligned, including through allegations related to sexual orientation, in efforts to suppress their advocacy.145

 

The murder in El Salvador of Tania Vásquez a human rights defender, earlier this year (supra note 61), together with the evidence of attacks, torture, ill-treatment and discrimination towards LGBTI persons highlights how the freedom of expression in relation to LGBTI persons in El Salvador is similarly threatened.

 

11. FAMILY LIFE

 

Article 23 of the ICCPR states that “[t]he family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.” In previous Concluding Observations, the UN Human Rights Committee has welcomed the legal recognition of same-sex civil partnerships and has called upon States to grant the same benefits to non-married homosexual couples as are already available to non-married heterosexual couples.146

 

146 Human Rights Committee, Concluding Observations, Japan, 29 UN Doc CCPR/C/JPN/CO/5, 18th December 2008.

 

147 (n 67), Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011 para 66 and footnote 128.

 

148 See (n 79).

 

149 Karen Atala and Daughters v. Chile, Case 1271-04, report No. 42/08, OEA/Ser.L/V/II.130 Doc. 22, rev. 1 (2008).

 

150 See Joslin v. New Zealand (CCPR/C/75/D/902/1999), 10 IHRR 40 (2003).

 

151 See Young v. Australia (CCPR/C/78/D/941/2000), para. 10.4.

 

While families and communities are often an important source of support, discriminatory attitudes within families and communities can also inhibit the ability of LGBTI people to enjoy the full range of human rights. Such discrimination manifests itself in various ways, including through individuals being excluded from family homes, disinherited, prevented from going to school, sent to psychiatric institutions, forced to marry, forced to relinquish children, punished for activist work and subjected to attacks on personal reputation. In many cases, lesbians, bisexual women and transgender people are especially at risk owing to entrenched gender inequalities that restrict autonomy in decision-making about sexuality, reproduction and family life.147

 

It is submitted that such discriminatory attitudes exist in El Salvador, as highlighted by the direct account of one lesbian woman in El Salvador, located at page 14 of this document.148

 

Discriminatory attitudes are also sometimes reflected in decisions regarding child custody. For example, one Inter-American Court of Human Rights case concerned a lesbian mother and her daughters seeking redress for a decision by the Chilean authorities to deny the lesbian mother custody of her children based on her sexual orientation149 In reaching its decision, the Inter-American Court found that the weight of international authority makes it clear that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation violates protected human rights and that there is no justification for courts to consider parent’s sexual orientation when considering making custody determinations.

 

11.1 Denial of recognition of relationships and related access to State and other benefits

The UN Human Rights Committee has held that States are not required, under international law, to allow same-sex couples to marry.150 However, the obligation to protect individuals from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation extends to ensuring that unmarried same-sex couples are treated in the same way and entitled to the same benefits as unmarried opposite-sex couples.151

 

In some countries, the State provides benefits for married and unmarried heterosexual couples but denies these benefits to unmarried homosexual couples. Examples include pension entitlements, the ability to leave property to a surviving partner, the opportunity to remain in public housing following a partner’s death, or the chance to secure residency for a foreign partner. Lack of official recognition of same-sex relationships and absence of legal prohibition on discrimination can also result in same-sex partners being discriminated against by private actors, including health-care providers and insurance companies.152

 

152 (n 75), Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 17 November 2011, p. 22 Para 69.

 

153 Available at: http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html last accessed 20 July 2013.

 

154 Available at: http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html , last accessed 20 July 2013.

 

155 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 4 (2003) Adolescent Health and Development in the Context of the Rights of the Child. UN Doc CRC/GC/2003/4, para 6.

 

The failure to recognise the validity of same sex relationships in El Salvador, and the devaluing of people in these relationships as a result, has a severe impact on the LGBTI community’s right to a family life. In her blog on El Salvador, Grit and Grace, Danielle Mackey reported in August 2012, an interview with two activists from the Salvadoran lesbian community, Veronica Reyna and Andrea Ayala, and The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD).153

 

In this interview, both activists told of the negative attitudes they experienced when they came out. In Andrea Ayala’s case, this included being sent to a psychologist and being prescribed medication in an attempt to ‘cure’ her. However, she says, ‘Of course, I was never cured because I was never sick and I love women, but I had to live a parallel life; the life in front of my family and a hidden life as a lesbian, where I would have to escape from class to see my girlfriend in high school.”154

 

This demonstrates that being LGBTI not only affects an individual’s immediate family life but also their ability to enter into a relationship of their choosing.

 

12. SPECIAL PROTECTION FOR CHILDREN

 

Article 24(1) of the ICCPR states that children shall have “the right to such measures of protection as are required by his status as a minor, on the part of his family, society and the State.” Moreover, it is acknowledged that El Salvador has ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and according to the General Comments of the Committee of the Rights of the Child, the Convention rights should not be the subject of any discrimination, including sexual orientation and HIV/AIDS.155

 

LGBTI youth in El Salvador are in need of special protection. Schools provide no instruction on the concepts of sexual orientation or gender identity but rather tend to reinforce cultural stereotypes. This only serves to exclude and alienate the LGBTI community from a very young age.

 

In addition, this culture inevitably makes young people afraid to ask questions relating to sex and sexuality, which prevents them from accessing vital information with regards to how to stay safe sexually and protect themselves from sexually transmitted diseases.

 

This situation may have contributed to the fact that in 2009, the Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defence of Women’s Rights (CLADEM) reported that, in the previous four years, cases of HIV/AIDS in El Salvador had increased significantly.156

 

156 UN Human Rights Council, summary of 9 stakeholders’ submissions to the Universal Periodic Review 25 November 2009, UN Doc A/HRC/WG.6/7/SLV/3. Summary of the submission by Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defence of Women’s Rights (CLADEM) para 43.

 

157 Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defence of Women’s Rights (CLADEM), p. 2 para. 9

 

158 National STD/HIV/AIDS Program (2008) One Step Ahead on the Response to HIV, AIDS and Tuberculosis, p. 10.

 

159 Los Tres Uno supone la implementación de: Un solo marco de acción que provea las bases para una labor coordinada de todos los sectores; Una autoridad Coordinadora nacional para la lucha contra el VIH/SIDA con un amplio mandato multisectorial; y Un Sistema único nacional de monitoreo y Evolución.

 

CLADEM have also noted that, in dealing with sexuality and reproduction, a mythologised vision prevails and measures to prevent HIV emphasise sexual abstinence, mutual fidelity and postponing the beginning of sexual relations, and there is still no sexual education based on scientific evidence and focusing on rights.157

 

Moreover, between 1984 and October 2008 there were 21,908 HIV-AIDS cases registered in El Salvador. 13,487 were HIV infections and 8,421 were in the AIDS phase. 32 per cent of the cases related to those 20 – 34 years of age.158 This demonstrates the importance of providing young people with sufficient information to be able to protect themselves from danger. Given that the LGBTI community in El Salvador is most at risk of HIV infection, it is important that the State incorporates LGBTI considerations into any policy it develops for HIV and AIDS prevention.

 

However, it is noted that there have been recent positive improvements in this regard. Through the National Programme for the Prevention, Care and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections and HIV/AIDS of the Ministry of Public Health and Social Welfare, and in cooperation with organisations and institutions from different sectors of society, the Government has taken steps to find solutions, strategies and actions to respond to the challenges posed by HIV/AIDS, in terms of prevention, care and treatment. These strategies have been devised on the basis of the Joint United Nation Programme on HIV/AIDS recommendations for compliance with the “Three Ones” principle.159 At the national level, various educational campaigns have been launched in order to raise public awareness of HIV/AIDS, with emphasis on the prevention of infection.

 

13. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMENDATIONS

 

13.1 Conclusions

 

This report has aimed to build on and highlight the widespread and systematic human rights violations currently taking place against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersexual (LGBTI) population in El Salvador. It has highlighted the continuing serious nature and level of human rights violations towards the LGBTI community.

 

This report has also aimed to highlight how, despite Presidential Decree 56 prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, in practice discrimination is still widespread. There is also widespread official and societal discrimination based on sexual orientation and transgender status in employment and access to health care and identity documents.

 

Furthermore, discrimination against the LGBTI community is present in the media, where LGBTI-related stories are often sensationalised or not treated with objectivity or sensitivity. Media coverage includes generalisations and rampant stereotyping of LGBTI persons.

 

With regards to the perpetrators of LGBTI violence, El Salvador can look to two main sections of the population causing harm. The first is Gangs, which often target LGBTI persons and single them out. Gangs consistently intimidate and threaten the LGBTI community. Secondly, at a state level, the police are also responsible for a shocking lack of empathy and interest in the LGBTI population. This report has highlighted how the police have been reluctant to investigate crimes affecting LGBTI persons or are unwilling to take complaints of such crimes seriously. At the highest level of authority, LGBTI persons are not being treated equally and are in fact being rendered second-class citizens by the authorities in place to protect all citizens of El Salvador.

 

In employment and education, LGBTI persons continue to be placed at a significant disadvantage. At work, LGBTI persons admit to hiding their sexuality out of fear of being singled-out by co-workers and superiors. They have admitted to feeling less likely to be promoted or assigned higher quality work, should they disclose their sexuality. Those who have been open about their LGBTI status report having been consistently discriminated against by their employers. In education, LGBTI persons report having been refused entry into certain schools, colleges and universities based on their LGBTI status.160

 

160 (n9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report, p. 40.

 

161 Per Ana Montano based on her conversation with LGBTI religious leaders in El Salvador.

 

In the sphere of healthcare, the LGBTI community has expressed a lack of sensitivity by different healthcare providers and professionals. Doctors and nurses are less likely to take their conditions as seriously and to offer them the support and help they often need. This is especially true with regards to HIV patients (a disproportionately large number of whom are LGBTI persons) who often face difficulties in accessing the necessary treatments needed.
Finally, LGBTI persons in El Salvador feel that fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and assembly are often undermined. LGBTI support groups are targeted; marches and protests of the LGBTI community are disrupted. Also, permits for such marches and demonstrations (including for Gay Pride) are routinely denied to organisations.161

 

In general, this report has also sought to highlight how discrimination towards LGBTI persons in El Salvador is very common and creates a climate where violence, torture and ill- treatment towards the LGBTI community is tolerated and accepted.

 

It is submitted that, at the heart of the problem of LGBTI rights is the actual perception of the LGBTI community in El Salvador. A survey on this issue from February 2013 sheds some light on the disturbing views many Salvadorians have of the LGBTI community.

 

The results of the survey concluded as follows:

 

. Civil servants admitted that LGBTI persons are often discriminated against.

 

. Civil servants also recognised that one of the main obstacles to equal treatment is a lack of a legal framework that may prevent, supervise, prohibit and punish discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

 

. LGBTI persons still suffer the violation of very basic human rights such as the right to life, to personal integrity, to safety. Transgender women, gay men and transvestites are particularly affected.

 

. There are specific difficulties for transgender persons. Firstly, they are unable to obtain legal recognition of their preferred gender, which leads to serious violations of their rights to civil unions, forming of a family and many other civil rights.

 

. In society, there are issues of homophobia, lesbophobia, transphobia that translate into several manifestations of exclusion, marginalisation and violation of rights of LGBTI persons, limiting their access to services they are constitutionally entitled to.162

 

162 Survey of the Perception of Human Rights of the LGBT Community in El Salvador, February 2013.

 

In order to improve the quality of life and protection against discrimination for the LGBTI community, the perceptions and thoughts towards the LGBTI community must shift. Education is evidently at the heart of this issue.

 

Schools should be more open to discussing LGBTI issues with students and stressing the importance of respect towards those who are different. Civil servants, police, healthcare professionals and the media should be trained on LGBTI issues and to avoid harmful stereotypes.

 

The most effective way of dealing with many of these issues, it is argued, is through sophisticated legislation, which specifically enshrines the concept of LGBTI discrimination. A strong government, judiciary and police force enforcing this legislation would send a powerful message to the general population that the LGBTI community is a part of Salvadorian society, whose rights should be protected and upheld.

 

El Salvador has made significant steps towards improving the protections offered to the LGBTI community. However, more needs to be done to ensure that legislative initiatives are implemented and upheld.

 

13.2 Recommendations

 

In light of the above conclusions, it is recommended that the Government of El Salvador:

 

. Enacts laws prohibiting discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation;

 

. Implements legislation to ensure media stereotyping of LGBTI persons is prevented;

 

. Ensures that investigations of murders of LGBTI individuals are carried out in accordance with international standards;163

 

. Invites the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions to visit El Salvador;

 

. Implements procedures and legislation that protect the rights of LGBTI persons in custody;

 

. Ratifies the Optional Protocol of the UN Convention against Torture, which includes setting up a national preventative mechanism, leading to visits of places of detention by independent experts to help prevent abuses of those in custody;

 

. Invites the UN Special Rapporteur on torture, and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and Inter-American Rapporteur on Persons Deprived of Liberty to visit El Salvador;

 

. Implements programmes in schools and colleges, which value diversity in all its forms;

 

. Effectively enforces the constitution and the legal code, which provide that all persons are equal before the law and prohibit discrimination regardless of race, gender, disability, language, or social status;

 

. Enacts laws that enable transgender persons to receive new birth certificates thus enabling them to access healthcare, housing and employment;

 

. Enacts laws to ensure employment benefits for LGBTI persons are equivalent to those who are heterosexual;

 

. Implements legislation to ensure that same sex relationships are recognised;

 

. Ensures lawyers and human rights defenders representing LGBTI persons are protected in accordance with international standards;164

 

. Implements the recommendation of the UN High Commissioner of Human Rights by recommending that it is ensured that individuals can exercise their rights to freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly in safety without discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity;165

 

163 The UN Principals on the Effective Prevention and Investigation of Extra-legal, Arbitrary, and Summary Executions and the Model Protocol for a Legal Investigation of Extra-legal Arbitrary and Summary Executions (Minnesota Protocol).

 

164 These standards include: UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers (1990) Adopted by the Eighth United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, Havana, Cuba, 27 August to 7 September 1990 and the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders (adopted by the UN General Assembly on 8 March 1999).

 

165 Discriminatory laws and practices and acts of violence against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity, Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 17 November 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, para 84 (f)

 

. Implements the recommendation of the UN High Commissioner of Human Rights by ensuring that appropriate sensitisation and training programmes for police, prison officers, border guards, immigration officers and other law enforcement personnel are implemented;166

 

. Implements the recommendation of the UN High Commissioner of Human Rights by ensuring support for public information campaigns to counter homophobia and transphobia among the general public, and targeted anti-homophobia campaigns in schools;167

 

. Provides training to relevant members of the authorities to ensure that LGBTI persons can report crimes or discrimination without fear of harassment, stigmatisation or threats.

 

. Ensures that the all the above training is properly evaluated and followed up to ensure that the aims and objectives are fully realised;

 

. Increases engagement with the Inter-American Commission Unit on the Rights of LGBTI persons.

 

166 Discriminatory laws and practices and acts of violence against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity, Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 17 November 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, para 84 (h).

 

167 Ibid.

 

Acknowledgements:

 

The authors are grateful for the contributions of Linton Harper, Gisela Quevedo, Kathryn Greenman and Ana Montano, Executive Director of Asistencia Legal Para la Diversidad Sexual–El Salvador (‘ALDES’)

 

VIOLACIÓN DE LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS QUE AFECTAN A LA COMUNIDAD LESBIANA, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGÉNERO E INTRASEXUAL (PERSONAS LGBTI) EN EL SALVADOR

 

Por Gillian Melville, Alexandra Mostaza Scallon y David Palmer.

 

Presentado en nombre del Solicitors’ International Human Rights Group (SIHRG, por sus siglas en inglés).

 

Traducido al español por Náyua Abdelkefi Zorrilla.

 

1. RESUMEN EJECUTIVO

 

El objetivo de este informe consiste en fundamentar y poner de relieve las violaciones sistemáticas y generalizadas que se están produciendo de los derechos humanos de la comunidad lesbiana, gay, bisexual, transgénero e intersexual (LGBTI) en El Salvador.

 

En particular, este informe llama la atención sobre los siguientes puntos principales:

 

. La gente en El Salvador se ve sometida a la discriminación debido a su orientación sexual e/o identidad de género tanto por el Estado como por actores no estatales. Dicha discriminación incluye el acceso a servicios de salud y educación, empleo y subsidios.

 

. Aunque la falta de información hace difícil saber cuáles son las cifras exactas, está claro que existen continuas violaciones de los derechos a la vida de gente LGBTI en El Salvador basándose en su orientación sexual e/o identidad de género. Debido a la persistencia de estereotipos y prejuicios sobre el papel de la mujer dentro de la sociedad, las lesbianas y mujeres transgénero están particularmente en riesgo.

 

. El Salvador no está impidiendo, investigando, informando ni procesando adecuadamente los incidentes de violencia y los asesinatos por motivos de género, incluyendo aquellos contra gente LGBTI.

 

. La gente LGBTI sufre un tratamiento cruel, inhumano y degradante que incluye: una constante amenaza de violencia que llega hasta la tortura; violencia sexual en los centros de detención; así como violencia a manos de la policía.

 

. El Estado de El Salvador se niega a reconocer los crímenes por motivos de género como una categoría aparte de los asesinatos motivados por el odio.

 

. El Salvador no toma medidas para prevenir que los medios de comunicación promuevan los estereotipos negativos que existen hacia la comunidad LGBTI.

 

. Al negar a las personas transgénero documentos de identidad apropiados, El Salvador no está reconociendo ni respetando la identidad de género o a las personas transgénero.

 

Se afirma que esta situación supone la violación del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos (PIDCP),1 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (PIDESC),2 la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos3, la Convención contra la Tortura y otros Tratos o Penas Crueles, Inhumanos o Degradantes (CAT, por sus siglas en inglés),4 la Convención Interamericana para Prevenir y Sancionar la Tortura5, la Convención sobre la Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Contra la Mujer , CETFDCM (también conocida por sus siglas en inglés CEDAW),6 la Convención Interamericana para Prevenir, Sancionar y Erradicar la Violencia contra la Mujer (Convención de Belém do Pará)7 y de los Principios y Buenas Prácticas sobre la Protección de las Personas Privadas de Libertad en las Américas.

 

1 Ratificado por El Salvador el 30 de noviembre de 1979.

 

2 Ratificado por El Salvador el 30 de noviembre de 1979.

 

3 Ratificada por El Salvador el 20 de junio de 1978.

 

4 Aceptada por El Salvador el 17 de junio de 1966.

 

5 Ratificada por El Salvador el 17 de octubre de 1994.

 

6 Ratificada por El Salvador el 13 de noviembre de 1995.

 

7 Convención Interamericana para Prevenir, Sancionar y Erradicar la Violencia contra la Mujer.

 

8 Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos “Entre Amigos”, Comisión Internacional Gay y Lesbiana de Derechos Humanos (IGLHRC por sus siglas en inglés), Global Rights, Programa de Derechos Humanos de la International Human Rights Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos) de la Escuela de Derecho de Harvard

 

2. INTRODUCCIÓN

 

El objetivo de este informe es proporcionar información actualizada sobre la situación vigente a la que se enfrenta la comunidad LGBTI en El Salvador. Este informe se basa en el informe paralelo anterior presentado por Entre Amigos et al8 y también se inspira en un (HLS) y la Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Personas Trans (Red LACTRANS). Informe paralelo La Violación de los derechos de la gente lesbiana, gay, bisexual y transgénero en El Salvador (2010) presentado al Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 10 de agosto de 2010, disponible en: http://www.iglhrc.org/content/la-situaci%C3%B3n-de-los-derechos-humanos-de-las-personas-lesbianas-gays-bisexuales-y-transgenero, visitado por última vez el 12 de junio de 2013.

 

9 Universidad de Berkeley, California (2012) Diversidad sexual en El Salvador, un informe sobre la situación de los derechos humanos de la comunidad LGBT, Julio de 2012, disponible en: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/LGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf, visitado por última vez el 12 de junio de 2013.

 

10 Leyes y prácticas discriminatorias y actos de violencia contra individuos basados en su orientación sexual e identidad de género. Informe de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos, 17 de noviembre de 2011, UN Doc. A/HRC/19/41, apartado 20.

 

11 Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos “Entre Amigos”, Comisión Internacional Gay y Lesbiana de Derechos Humanos (IGLHRC por sus siglas en inglés), Global Rights, Programa de Derechos Humanos de la International Human Rights Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos) de la Escuela de Derecho de Harvard (HLS) y la Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Personas Trans (Red LACTRANS). Informe paralelo La Violación de los derechos de la gente lesbiana, gay, bisexual y transgénero en El Salvador (2010) presentado al Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 10 de agosto de 2010, disponible en: http://www.iglhrc.org/content/la-situaci%C3%B3n-de-los-derechos-humanos-de-las-personas-lesbianas-gays-bisexuales-y-transgenero, visitado por última vez el 12 de junio de 2013.

 

12 Ibid. p. 3

 

13 Facultad de derecho de UNSW disponible en: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/news/2012/10/international-anti-homophobia-legal-clinic-el-salvador-seeks-legal-advocates, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

informe posterior elaborado por International Human Rights Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos) de la Universidad de Berkeley en California en julio de 2012.9

 

Este informe llega en un momento en que, por un lado, la comunidad internacional ha comenzado a dar prioridad a los derechos de la gente LGBTI en la agenda internacional, mientras que por otro lado, se siguen denunciando las violaciones de los estándares internacionales en todas las regiones.10

Un informe paralelo fue presentado en 2010 por Entre Amigos et al,11 resaltando que en el sexto informe periódico que fue presentado por el Estado, a través del cual tenía la oportunidad de proporcionar detalles sobre su cumplimiento del PIDCP, no mencionó en absoluto a la comunidad LGBTI. Y esto fue a pesar del hecho de que el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU expresó en sus observaciones concluyentes del Tercer, Cuarto y Quinto Informes Periódicos sobre El Salvador, su preocupación por el número de incidentes de gente que es atacada e incluso asesinada por su orientación sexual, además de por el escaso número de investigaciones que se llevan a cabo de tales actos ilegales.12

 

Desde que se presentó el informe paralelo de Entre Amigos en 2010, los asesinatos extra-judiciales y otras atrocidades contra gente LGBTI han continuado en El Salvador (Ver sección más abajo sobre el Derecho a la Vida). Según la mayoría de los informes, ha habido más de 47 asesinatos de hombres homosexuales, transexuales y travestis desde que se presentó el informe paralelo.13 También se sabe que nadie ha sido llevado ante la justicia en relación a estos asesinatos.14 Muchas otras personas LGBTI son regularmente atacadas, apaleadas, amenazadas y rechazadas.15

 

14 Ibid.

 

15 Ver informe ‘La Alianza por la Diversidad Sexual LGBT de El Salvador’ un informe sobre las agresiones sufridas por la comunidad LGBT en El Salvador entre enero y septiembre de 2009.

 

16 Observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos, 18 de noviembre de 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, p.3

 

17 Los Principios de Yogyakarta: La aplicación de la legislación internacional de derechos humanos en relación con la orientación sexual y la identidad de género en 6 FN 1 (marzo de 2007) disponible en http://www.yogyakartaprinciples.org/principles_sp.htm

 

Se afirma que estas agresiones constituyen una forma de violencia de género, motivadas por un deseo de castigar a quienes se considera que están desafiando las normas de género. El Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU expresó en sus observaciones concluyentes de 2010, su preocupación sobre la persistencia de estereotipos y prejuicios respecto al papel de la mujer en la sociedad de El Salvador y pidió que El Salvador diseñase e implementase programas que tuviesen como objetivo eliminar los estereotipos de género, incluyendo la creación de un sistema estadístico que pudiese proporcionar datos desglosados sobre la violencia de género.16

 

Se afirma, además, que estos estereotipos sobre el género persisten hasta nuestros días lo cual afecta gravemente a los derechos de la comunidad LGBTI. Es más, la falta de reconocimiento de la naturaleza específica de la violencia hacia gente LGBTI por parte del Estado y, consecuentemente, el hecho de no presentar estadísticas sobre este tipo de violencia permite a las autoridades ignorar y tergiversar los abusos homofóbicos y transfóbicos.

 

3. DEFINICIÓN DE LGBTI: Orientación sexual e Identidad de Género

 

La orientación sexual se refiere a la “capacidad de cada persona de sentir una atracción emocional profunda, afectiva y sexual, así como relaciones íntimas y sexuales con individuos de otro sexo o del mismo sexo o de más de un sexo.” Este término incluye las orientaciones sexuales de lesbianas, gays, bisexuales y heterosexuales.17

 

La identidad de género se refiere a “La vivencia del género sentida interna e individualmente por cada persona, que puede o no corresponder con el sexo asignado al nacer, incluyendo la sensación personal del cuerpo (que puede implicar, si se elige libremente, la modificación de la apariencia o función corporal por medios médicos, quirúrgicos u otros) así como otras expresiones de género incluyendo la vestimenta, el habla y los gestos.” La manifestación externa de la identidad de género de una persona se conoce como la expresión de género. La expresión de género suele conllevar un comportamiento “masculino”, “femenino” o de género variante.18

 

18 La Alianza de Gays y Lesbianas contra la Difamación (GLAAD, por sus siglas en inglés), Guía de Referencia de los Medios 7 (8ª edición, mayo de 2000).

 

19 Ibid. en 8.

 

20 Ibid. en 9.

 

21 Ibid. en 9.

 

22 Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos de la Asamblea General (DUDH), http://www.un.org/es/documents/udhr/, visitado por última vez el 4 de agosto de 2013.

 

23 Ver El derecho a la igualdad y a la no discriminación, Centro Islandés de Derechos Humanos, en http://www.humanrights.is/thehumanrightsproject/humanrightscasesandmaterials/humanrightsconceptsideasandfora/substantivehumanrights/therighttoequalityandnondiscrimination/, visitado por última vez el 4 de agosto de 2013.

 

Las personas transgénero suelen hacer que su expresión de género corresponda a su identidad de género.19 Es decir, una persona que al nacer tiene sexo masculino, pero que tiene un sentimiento interior de ser mujer, es una mujer transgénica. El transgénero es, por lo tanto, un término utilizado para personas cuya identidad de género y/o expresión de género y su sexo de nacimiento no coinciden. Este término puede incluir a transexuales, travestis y otras personas de género variante. El cambio de sexo no es un proceso corto ni sencillo, sino más bien un proceso que transcurre durante un largo periodo de tiempo que se conoce como una “transición”.20

 

Los pasos que pueden existir, aunque no siempre, durante la transición son: informar a la familia y amigos, cambiar de nombre y/o sexo en los documentos oficiales, someterse a una terapia hormonal y un tratamiento médico que a menudo incluye cirugía.21

 

Instrumentos de derechos humanos prohíben la discriminación por diversos motivos. El Artículo 2 de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos (DUDH)22 prohíbe la discriminación por los siguientes 10 motivos: raza, color, sexo, idioma, religión, opinión política o de otra índole, origen nacional o social, posición económica, nacimiento y cualquier otra condición social. Los mismos motivos prohibidos están incluidos en el Artículo 2 del PIDESC y en el Artículo 2 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos. Es importante resaltar que los motivos en estas disposiciones no son exhaustivos y que el término ‘otra condición social’ tiene un significado abierto. Esto quiere decir que algunos motivos que no han sido mencionados explícitamente, como la edad, el sexo, la discapacidad, la nacionalidad y la orientación sexual también se podrían considerar como motivos prohibidos de discriminación.23

 

En su Observación General del 2 de julio de 2009, el Comité de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales observó que ‘otra condición social’ incluía la orientación sexual: “Los Estados partes deben cerciorarse de que las preferencias sexuales de una persona no constituyan un obstáculo para hacer realidad los derechos económicos, culturales y sociales que reconoce el Pacto, por ejemplo, a los efectos de acceder a la pensión de viudedad. La identidad de género también se reconoce como motivo prohibido de discriminación.”24

 

24 Observación General 20 del Consejo Económico y Social de la ONU, la no-discriminación de derechos económicos, sociales y culturales (art. 2, apartado 2, del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales) UN Doc E/C.12/GC/20, apartado 32.

 

25 Ibid.

 

26 Ver informe 2012 de seguridad sobre El Salvador del Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, disponible en: https://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=12336, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013, p.3.

 

27 Informe 2011 de derechos humanos en El Salvador del Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, disponible en http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/2011/wha/186513.htm , p.22.

 

En esa misma Observación General el Comité también hizo referencia a los Principios de Yogyakarta sobre la puesta en práctica del Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos en relación a la Orientación Sexual y la Identidad de Género (de aquí en adelante ‘los Principios’) como fuente de orientación para las definiciones de “orientación sexual” e “identidad de género”.25

 

Los Principios, que no son vinculantes, fueron desarrollados por expertos en derechos humanos y han sido utilizados por varios organismos de la ONU.

 

4. ANTECEDENTES

 

4.1 Patrón de la discriminación y la violencia generalizada contra la comunidad LGBT El Salvador, un país de unos seis millones de habitantes, tiene cientos de conocidas bandas callejeras (maras) que suman más de 20.000 miembros. El número de estas maras violentas, bien armadas, de estilo estadounidense continúa en aumento en El Salvador, con las maras Los Ángeles’ 18th Street y MS-13 (“Mara Salvatrucha”) siendo las mayores del país.26

 

La discriminación basada en la orientación sexual es generalizada y las personas transgénero también son víctimas de un trato discriminatorio.27 Asimismo existe discriminación oficial y social generalizada basada en la orientación sexual en el mundo laboral, en el acceso a la atención sanitaria y en el acceso a documentos de identidad; este informe abordará todos estos puntos en detalle más adelante.

 

La discriminación hacia personas LGBTI en El Salvador crea un clima en el cual la violencia, la tortura y el maltrato hacia la comunidad LGBTI se aceptan y toleran. Dicha discriminación también proporciona un clima en el cual las personas pueden ver negado el acceso a una serie de servicios incluyendo el empleo, la vivienda y la asistencia sanitaria.

 

Los Artículos 2(1) y 26 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos establecen el respeto, la igualdad y la no discriminación de todas las personas en base a, entre otras cosas, la raza, el color y el sexo. En la decisión histórica de Toonen contra Australia de 1994, el Comité consideró no sólo que la referencia al “sexo” en los Artículos 2(1) y 26 debía incluir la orientación sexual, sino también que las leyes que penalizan los actos homosexuales consentidos violan expresamente la protección de la privacidad del Artículo 17.28

 

28 Toonen contra Australia, CCPR/C/50/D/488/1992, Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU (CDH), 4 de abril de 1994, apartados 8.6, 8.7 y 11.

 

29 Constitución de El Salvador, disponible en: http://www.constitution.org/cons/elsalvad.htm

 

30 Ibid.

 

31 La Página 2 de diciembre de 2012, Presentan estudios sobre derechos humanos de comunidad gay en El Salvador, disponible en: http://www.lapagina.com.sv/nacionales/74663/2012/12/02/Presentan-estudios-sobre-derechos-humanos-de-comunidad-gay-en-El-Salvador, visitado por última vez el 16 de abril de 2013.

 

32 (n9) Diversidad Sexual en El Salvador un informe sobre la situación de los derechos humanos de la comunidad LGBT, Julio de 2012, páginas 14 a 16.

 

33 (n31).

 

El Artículo 1de la Constitución de El Salvador establece que: “El Salvador reconoce a la persona humana como el origen y el fin de la actividad del Estado, que está organizado para la consecución de la justicia, de la seguridad jurídica y del bien común. Asimismo reconoce a todo ser humano como persona humana desde el momento de su concepción. En consecuencia, es obligación del Estado asegurar a los habitantes de la República, el goce de la libertad, la salud, la cultura, el bienestar económico y la justicia social”29

 

El Artículo 3 de la Constitución de la República de El Salvador manifiesta que: “Todas las personas son iguales ante la ley. Para el goce de los derechos civiles no podrán establecerse restricciones que se basen en diferencias de nacionalidad, raza, sexo o religión. No se reconocen empleos ni privilegios hereditarios.”30

 

Sin embargo, un estudio publicado en 2012 muestra que El Salvador está lejos de garantizar los derechos fundamentales a los no heterosexuales, tales como el acceso a la educación, la sanidad, la vivienda y el desarrollo profesional pleno sin discriminación alguna.31

 

Los crímenes de odio contra las personas que son “sexualmente distintas” se encuentran entre los principales problemas de El Salvador, así como la negación de la educación a personas transgénero o transexuales.32

 

Los investigadores también han encontrado medios de comunicación negativos que “continúan reforzando el estigma” contra estos grupos.33

 

El Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU ha instado a los Estados parte a “garantizar la igualdad de derechos a todas las personas, según lo establecido en el PIDCP, independientemente de su orientación sexual” y ha pedido específicamente a El Salvador que promulgue leyes que prohíban la discriminación motivada por la orientación sexual.34

 

34 Ver las observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos sobre El Salvador, 18 de noviembre de 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, apartado 3 c.

 

35 Informes de 2012 de países sobre prácticas de derechos humanos del Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, El Salvador, disponible en: http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/#wrapper, visitado por última vez el 4 de agosto de 2013.

 

36 Ibid. Sección 6, bajo el enunciado, Discriminación, Abusos Sociales y Tráfico de Personas.

 

El Departamento de Estado de los EEUU declaró en su informe de 2012 sobre El Salvador35 que, aunque la constitución y el código legal de El Salvador establecen que todas las personas son iguales ante la ley y prohíben la discriminación sin distinción de raza, sexo, discapacidad, idioma o condición social, en la práctica el gobierno no ha ejecutado de manera eficaz estas prohibiciones. En su lugar, denunció la discriminación contra varios grupos que incluían mujeres, personas discapacitadas, personas LGBTI e indígenas; aunque reconoció que la Secretaría de Inclusión Social (SIS), liderada por la Primera Dama Vanda Pignato, se había esforzado por superar el sesgo que tradicionalmente impera en todas estas áreas.36

 

4.2 Protección jurídica de la comunidad LGBTI desde 2010, y una falta de aplicación eficaz

 

Como se ha mencionado anteriormente, la constitución de El Salvador y su código penal no prohíben explícitamente la discriminación motivada por la orientación sexual, la identidad de género y la expresión de género. Sin embargo, en 2010, El Salvador adoptó el Acuerdo nº 202 para erradicar todo tipo de discriminación basada en la orientación sexual de los servicios de sanidad pública. También adoptó el Decreto Presidencial nº 56 el 4 de mayo de 2010 cuyo objetivo era prevenir la discriminación basada en la identidad de género y/u orientación sexual entre los empleados públicos y creó la Dirección de Diversidad Sexual dependiente de la Secretaría de Inclusión Social. Sin embargo, a pesar de esto, continúan los actos de violencia y discriminación contra la población LGBTI en El Salvador y los indicios apuntan a que la discriminación por parte de funcionarios hacia las personas LGBTI continúa siendo un problema grave. Es más, un decreto no es lo mismo que una nueva legislación sino que depende de la voluntad política del gobierno. Por lo tanto, si se elige un nuevo gobierno, no existen garantías de que el próximo gobierno mantenga dicho decreto. Además, el decreto sólo se aplica dentro de la administración pública y carece de capacidad para sancionar ya que no conlleva ningún mecanismo de imposición.

 

En su informe de 2012 sobre los derechos humanos en El Salvador, el Departamento de Estado declaraba que: “… discriminación significativa contra las personas transgénero. Existía una discriminación oficial y social generalizada basada en la orientación sexual en el mundo laboral, en el acceso a la atención sanitaria y en el acceso a documentos de identidad. La ONG Entre Amigos denunció que funcionarios públicos, la policía incluida, ejercían la violencia y la discriminación contra las minorías sexuales. Personas de la comunidad LGBT afirmaron que las agencias encargadas de procesar documentos de identidad, la PNC (Policía Nacional Civil) y la PGR (Procuraduría General de la República) les ridiculizaron cuando solicitaron documentos de identidad o cuando denunciaron casos de violencia contra personas LGBT. El gobierno respondió a estos abusos principalmente a través de informes de la PDDH (Procuraduría para la Defensa de los Derechos Humanos) que divulgaban casos específicos de violencia y discriminación hacia minorías sexuales.”37

 

37 (n 35) Sección 6, bajo el enunciado ‘Abusos Sociales, Discriminación y Actos de Violencia Basados en la Orientación Sexual y la Identidad de Género.’

 

38 (n 31).

 

39 (n 31).

 

40 (n9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 14.

41 Ibid.

 

Esta situación existe en muchos otros países de la región. Ortega Ariñez Carlos Castel, un investigador nicaragüense ha enfatizado que el progreso en cada país es distinto. Aunque se han producido avances importantes en El Salvador, no han conseguido hacer cumplir las normas legales en beneficio de la comunidad LGBTI, así como tampoco existe una concienciación de los medios de comunicación.38

 

En 2012, El Centro de Estudios Internacionales (CEI) y la Asociación COMCAVIS Trans llevaron a cabo una investigación independiente sobre la situación en El Salvador. La investigación duró seis meses, durante los cuales voluntarios de El Salvador recabaron información y analizaron varias leyes, la constitución y tratados internacionales de la ONU y de la OEA (Organización de Estados Americanos). También se analizó el contenido de periódicos de los diez años precedentes. Esta investigación mostró que las noticias relacionadas con personas LGBTI suelen ser sensacionalistas y que tienden a ocultar los crímenes de odio como crímenes pasionales.39

 

En efecto, este clima hacia las personas LGBTI en El Salvador continúa perpetuando la discriminación contra la comunidad LGBTI a manos de los actores estatales y no estatales, que a menudo se manifiesta a través de la violencia.

 

4.3 Violencia por parte de actores no estatales: Las Maras

 

Activistas LGBTI denuncian que las maras criminales han sido relacionadas con la violencia contra personas LGBTI.40 En particular, la incapacidad o falta de voluntad de “pagar el alquiler” (una tasa instaurada por las maras por el uso de determinadas zonas de la calle) pueden dar lugar a la violencia contra los profesionales del sexo y sus familias.41

 

Fansheska, una activista transgénero y profesional del sexo recibió cuatro disparos en 2006 tras negarse a “pagar el alquiler.”42

 

42 Ibid.

 

43 Ver Ningún lugar donde esconderse: Violencia estatal, de maras y clandestina en El Salvador, Programa de Derechos Humanos de la International Human Rights Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos) de la Facultad de Derecho de Harvard, 2007, disponible en: http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/hrp/documents/FinalElSalvadorReport(3-6-07).pdf, visitado por última vez el 4 de agosto de 2013.

 

44 (n9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 14.

 

45 Ver Facultad de Derecho de Harvard, La Violación de los Derechos de Personas Lesbianas, Gay, Bisexuales y Transgénero en El Salvador (2010), disponible en: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/docs/ngo/LGBT_Shadow_Report_El_Salvador_HRC100.pdf, p.8.

 

46 Marielos Olivo, Diagnóstico para la construcción de políticas públicas inclusivas, diversas y respetuosas de los derechos humanos de las personas con orientación e identidad sexual diversa, Coordinación LGBT. El Salvador 2007, at 16.

 

47 (n 27), p. 22.

 

48 Entrevista de Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana (con Sayuri y Alejandra), Directora, COMCAVIS-TRANS, en San Salvador, El Salvador (22 de febrero de 2011); referencia obtenida de (n9) Berkeley

 

La maras han evolucionado hasta convertirse en redes sofisticadas de crimen organizado capaces de aterrorizar a comunidades enteras y de manipular el sistema judicial.43 A su vez, las políticas anti-maras han generado su propio conjunto de problemas de derechos humanos como resultado de la concesión sin precedentes de poder a la policía nacional y del desgaste de las protecciones legales fundamentales.

 

Una ley anti-maras de 2010 criminalizó la pertenencia o la financiación de maras. Sin embargo, esto también ilegalizó el pago de tasas de extorsión y lo penalizó con seis años de prisión. Por lo tanto, la ley ha tenido el efecto no deseado de dejar a los ciudadanos privados vulnerables a la violencia si no cumplen con las exigencias de las maras, pero sujetos a sanciones penales si ceden a la extorsión de éstas.44

 

Un informe de 2010 de la Facultad de Derecho de Harvard establece que las maras, con frecuencia piden a los nuevos miembros que ataquen a la comunidad LGBTI como parte de su proceso de iniciación.45 Daisy, una mujer transgénero, denunció haber sido capturada por unos hombres en coche y haber sido apaleada y violada antes de ser dejada por sus captores en la calle.46

 

4.4 Violencia por parte de actores estatales: La Policía

 

Entre Amigos informa de que los funcionarios públicos, incluyendo a la policía, participan regularmente en la violencia y discriminación hacia las minorías sexuales47. Activistas LGBTI denunciaron que la policía había abusado sexualmente y violado a miembros de la comunidad LGBTI.48 Un informe publicado por los defensores de la comunidad LGBTI International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15.

 

49 (n9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15.

 

50 (n 27), p. 22.

 

51 (n 27), p. 6.

 

52 Ibid.

 

53 (n 27), p. 22.

 

54 Ibid.

 

en El Salvador documentaba un incidente particularmente desgarrador en el cual ocho agentes de la Policía Nacional Civil (PNC) se acercaron e interrogaron a un hombre homosexual y luego lo forzaron a entrar en un coche patrulla y lo llevaron a otro lugar donde lo violaron.49

 

El gobierno respondió a estos abusos principalmente a través de informes de la Oficina de la Procuraduría para la Defensa de los Derechos Humanos (PDDH) que divulgó casos específicos de violencia y discriminación hacia minorías sexuales. Sin embargo, el 13 de mayo de 2011, la Oficina de Diversidad Sexual de la Secretaría de Inclusión Social (SIS) también anunció una campaña de concienciación y una formación sobre los derechos de las personas LGBTI50 a la que acudieron cientos de funcionarios.51 Además, la Oficina del Inspector General (OIG) y otros organismos (incluyendo la SIS) proporcionaron una formación en derechos humanos para unos 4.700 agentes de la policía.52

 

A pesar de estas medidas positivas, la PDDH en El Salvador recibió denuncias sobre el asesinato de 13 personas de la comunidad LGBTI durante el primer semestre de 2011, en comparación a sólo dos muertes durante 2010.53 Los autores desconocemos hasta qué punto el aumento de estas cifras se debe a que la gente siente más confianza a la hora de denunciar tales delitos, o si el aumento demuestra que la violencia contra la comunidad LGBTI va en aumento. En cualquier caso, las cifras siguen siendo inaceptables.

 

El 18 de septiembre de 2011, la Asociación Solidaria para Impulsar el Desarrollo Humano de las Mujeres y Hombres Transexuales, Transgénero y Travestis declaró que hasta septiembre de ese año, los medios de comunicación habían denunciado 17 asesinatos, 23 casos de abuso policial y lesiones a 13 personas, tres de las cuales supuestamente fueron heridas por la policía. También denunciaron seis “crímenes de odio” y cuatro agresiones a personas LGBTI.54

 

En 2012, según el Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, la PDDH investigó ocho casos de posible violación de derechos humanos perpetrados contra personas LGBTI, dos de los cuales implicaban abusos por parte de la PNC, aunque la PDDH no recibió ningún informe sobre asesinatos de personas LGBTI.

 

El 1 de febrero de 2012, agentes de la policía supuestamente abusaron verbal y físicamente de un adolescente homosexual de 17 años, al que forzaron a bajarse de un autobús y andar varias manzanas mientras abusaban de él verbal y físicamente. Según el testimonio de la víctima, los agentes de policía hicieron una llamada de teléfono tras la cual llegaron tres miembros de una mara que apalearon a la víctima hasta que perdió la conciencia. Se ha informado de que este asunto está siendo investigado.55

 

55 (n35), bajo el enunciado ‘Abusos sociales, discriminación y actos violentos basados en la orientación sexual y en la identidad de género’.

 

56 Comunicado “Asociación COMCAVIS Trans El Salvador” mayo de 2013, p. 1.

 

57 ALDES (2012) Presentación sobre asesinatos extralegales de personas LGBT en El Salvador.

 

58 Ibid.

 

En mayo de 2013 la “Asociación COMVAVIS Trans de El Salvador” emitió un comunicado denunciando abusos a mujeres LGBTI en la prisión de Sensuntepeque en Cabañas. Explicaba cómo las mujeres transexuales y transgénero con VIH-SIDA y personas homosexuales continúan sufriendo abusos por parte de los guardias de la prisión quienes, eludiendo la asistencia legal, someten a los prisioneros a “castigos” degradantes como: forzarles a hacer 500 flexiones de brazos, dejar sus rodillas expuestas al sol durante más de dos horas, alimentación deficiente, denegación de atención médica y abusos verbales y físicos. Además, los prisioneros trans tienen prohibida la entrada en los talleres ofrecidos en las prisiones y, con frecuencia, sufren abusos y amenazas.56

 

Mientras que el gobierno ha puesto en marcha varias medidas para hacer frente a la discriminación generalizada y la violencia dirigida hacia las personas LGBTI, todavía no ha discernido ningún efecto positivo práctico de dichas medidas. La causa se debe seguramente a las opiniones sobre la comunidad LGBTI, profundamente arraigadas en la sociedad salvadoreña, reforzadas por los estereotipos negativos que se dan de la comunidad LGBTI en los medios.

 

5. LA VIOLACIÓN DEL DERECHO DE LAS PERSONAS LGBTI A LA VIDA

 

El Artículo 6 del PIDCP y el Artículo 4 de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos garantizan el derecho a la vida y establecen que ninguna persona puede ser privada de la vida arbitrariamente.

 

Se han documentado 128 asesinatos extralegales de personas LGBTI en El Salvador y en la gran mayoría de los casos no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna investigación eficaz y nadie ha sido llevado ante la justicia.57 Asistencia Legal Para la Diversidad Sexual (ALDES) afirma que se denunciaron 3 asesinatos de personas LGBTI en 2007, 11 en 2008, 23 en 2009, 10 en 2010 y 17 en 2011. Según Gays Sin Fronteras, 7 hombres homosexuales fueron asesinados en El Salvador en 2012. Una vez más, en la mayoría de estos casos no ha existido una investigación eficaz y los autores no han sido llevados ante la justicia.58

 

Recientemente la Fundación Mundial Déjame Vivir en Paz (FMDVP) ha denunciado el asesinato de al menos 12 miembros de la comunidad LGBTI en El Salvador, el resultado del aumento de la violencia contra la comunidad homosexual.59 Además, en 2013 han sido asesinados cinco mujeres transgénero y dos hombres gays (que no habían hecho pública su sexualidad). También fueron asesinadas en el país siete mujeres transgénero durante 2012.60

 

59 Disponible en: http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session7/SV/FMDVP_UPR_SLV_S07_2010_FundacionMundialDejameVivirenPaz.pdf, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

60 El Mundo, 16 de mayo de 2013, disponible en: http://elmundo.com.sv/denuncian-repunte-de-ataques-contra-comunidad-lgbti y www.elsalvador.com, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

61 Comunicado de COMCAVIS Trans.

 

62 Informe del Relator Especial sobre Ejecuciones extralegales, arbitrarias y sumarias sobre su misión en Guatemala 21-25 de agosto de 2006, UN Doc A/HRC/4/20/Add.2, apartado 32.

 

63 Observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU sobre El Salvador, 22 de julio de 2003. UN Doc CCPR/CO/78/SLV, apartado 16.

 

64 Observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU sobre El Salvador, 18 de noviembre de 2010. UN Doc. CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6 apartados 5, 6, 8 y 9.

En abril de 2013, se recibió un informe de la ONG COMCAVIS Trans sobre el asesinato en La Herradura, La Paz, de una joven transexual de 17 años llamada Perla. La víctima más reciente en el momento de escribir estas líneas es Tania Vásquez que fue asesinada en un crimen de odio en mayo de 2013. Era una mujer transgénero de 25 años, activista defensora de los derechos humanos y que también era miembro de COMCAVIS Trans.61

 

Es muy probable que los datos oficiales no reflejen el número verdadero de personas LGBTI asesinadas en El Salvador, si la orientación sexual o la identidad de género de la víctima no fueron registradas debidamente en su momento. La situación en El Salvador puede ser similar a la existente en Guatemala, donde el Relator Especial sobre ejecuciones extrajudiciales, sumarias o arbitrarias dijo con respecto a su misión a Guatemala en 2007 que, “Dada la falta de estadísticas oficiales y la posible reticencia o ignorancia de los miembros de la familia de la víctima, hay razones para creer que el número real [de asesinatos de personas LGBTI] es considerablemente mayor.62

 

Las observaciones concluyentes de 2003 del Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU incluían una “preocupación por los casos de personas atacadas, incluso muertas, en El Salvador con motivo de su orientación sexual, y por el escaso número de investigaciones en relación con estos actos ilícitos.”63

 

Parece ser que esta situación continúa en la actualidad.

 

Vale la pena señalar que, aunque el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU no menciona en particular delitos contra las personas LGBTI en sus observaciones concluyentes sobre El Salvador en 2010, sí que hace referencia a la falta de investigaciones de delitos pasados, a los alegatos de tortura y maltrato por parte de la policía y a la violencia, incluidos los asesinatos de mujeres.64

 

Incluso tras una amplia cobertura mediática de las críticas de la ONU por la incapacidad del gobierno de juzgar a los responsables de estos crímenes, los brutales asesinatos de varias mujeres transgénero en 2009 continúan sin investigarse. Por ejemplo, en febrero de 2011, Rianna, una mujer transgénero, fue violada y asesinada por una mara. No se publicó nada sobre su asesinato en la prensa salvadoreña y nadie ha sido juzgado por su muerte.65

 

Más recientemente, según se sabe a la hora de escribir estas líneas, el asesinato de Tania Vásquez en mayo de 2013 aún no ha sido investigado adecuadamente.66

 

65 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 14.

 

66 Declaración de COMCAVIS Trans.

 

67 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 14.

 

68 CCPR Observación General nº20. Disponible en: http://conf-dts1.unog.ch/1%20SPA/Tradutek/Derechos_hum_Base/CCPR/00_2_obs_grales_Cte%20DerHum%20%5BCCPR%5D.html#GEN20, apartado 2.

 

69 Ibid. apartado 11.

 

70 CCPR Observación General nº21 sobre el trato humano a personas privadas de libertad, disponible en: http://conf-dts1.unog.ch/1%20SPA/Tradutek/Derechos_hum_Base/CCPR/00_2_obs_grales_Cte%20DerHum%20%5BCCPR%5D.html#GEN20, apartado 4.

 

Es más, Entre Amigos, la principal organización de defensa de las personas LGBTI en el país, ha declarado que en muchos de estos casos los cuerpos de las víctimas revelaban signos de tortura, incluyendo desmembramiento, puñaladas, palizas y múltiples disparos.67

 

6. VIOLACIÓN DE LA PROHIBICIÓN DE LA TORTURA Y OTROS TRATOS O CASTIGOS CRUELES, INHUMANOS O DEGRADANTES

 

Los Artículos 7, 9 y 10 (1) del PIDCP reconocen el derecho de cada persona a ser libre de torturas, detenciones arbitrarias y de un tratamiento o castigo cruel, inhumano o degradante. En sus observaciones generales del Artículo 7, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU (CDH) ha señalado que los Estados tienen la obligación positiva de brindar protección a todo el mundo a través de medidas legislativas y de otra índole, contra actos de tortura, ya sean infligidos por personas que actúen en el desempeño de sus funciones oficiales, al margen de dichas funciones o incluso a título privado.68 Asimismo, debe registrarse la hora y el lugar de todos los interrogatorios junto con los nombres de todos los presentes, y dicha información también deberá estar disponible a efectos de los procedimientos judiciales o administrativos.69

 

A través de sus observaciones generales del Artículo 10, el CDH ha señalado que “tratar a toda persona privada de libertad con humanidad y respeto de su dignidad es una norma fundamental de aplicación universal… [que] debe aplicarse sin distinción de ningún género, como, por ejemplo, por motivos de raza, color, sexo, idioma, religión, opinión política o de otro género, origen nacional o social; patrimonio, nacimiento o cualquier otra condición.”70

 

El informe de Berkeley contiene descripciones de abusos que presuntamente han tenido lugar dentro de instalaciones policiales. Un defensor denuncia que la PNC coloca a las mujeres transgénero y lesbianas en la misma celda que los hombres detenidos, lo que ha resultado en violaciones de las mujeres en las celdas.71 Es más, hay ONGs que han recibido denuncias de violaciones y abusos a lesbianas y mujeres transgénero por parte de oficiales de la PNC y de los CAM (Cuerpos de Agentes Metropolitanos) durante su encarcelamiento.72

 

71 (n9) Informe de Berkeley, p.15.

 

72 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15-16.

 

73 Informe del Relator Especial sobre la violencia contra las mujeres, sus causas y consecuencias, Rashida Manjoo misión de seguimiento de El Salvador 17-19 de marzo de 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/17/26/Add.2, p. 9.

 

74 Ibid. Apartados 28-29.

 

75 Leyes y prácticas discriminatorias y actos de violencia cometidos contra personas por su orientación sexual e identidad de género, Informe del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos, 17 de noviembre de 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, apartado 34.

 

El siguiente caso de El Salvador demuestra algunos de los problemas mencionados en los últimos párrafos: la historia de Paula (nombre falso) demuestra el nivel de violencia que sufren las comunidades de lesbianas, gays, transgénero, bisexuales e intersexos en El Salvador. Cuando salía de una discoteca en San Salvador Paula sufrió agresiones brutales y disparos por parte de un grupo de hombres. Mientras estuvo en el hospital sufrió malos tratos y desprecio del personal sanitario por ser transgénero y seropositiva. Unos meses después de salir del hospital fue detenida y encarcelada durante dos años en una prisión para hombres por intento de homicidio, aunque ella alegaba defensa propia. Paula fue puesta en libertad cuando el hombre al que había atacado admitió su versión. Mientras estuvo en prisión estuvo en una celda con miembros de maras y fue violada más de 100 veces, en ocasiones con la complicidad de los funcionarios de prisiones. A su salida de la cárcel volvió a ser atacada por miembros de las maras que supieron que era seropositiva y que algunos de los que la habían violado en prisión habían sido infectados.73

 

6.1 Trato o Castigo Cruel, Inhumano o Degradante

 

Hay ejemplos continuos de tratos o castigos crueles, inhumanos o degradantes. Informando sobre la violencia contra las mujeres, el Relator Especial denunció recientemente presuntos casos de violaciones en grupo, violencia familiar y asesinatos que sufren las mujeres lesbianas, bisexuales y transgénero en El Salvador.74

El Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos informó en noviembre de 201175 que el Relator Especial sobre la tortura ha observado que en el país:

 

“A los miembros de las minorías sexuales se les somete en una proporción excesiva a torturas y otros malos tratos porque no responden a lo que socialmente se espera de uno y otro sexo. De hecho, la discriminación por razones de orientación o identidad sexuales puede contribuir muchas veces a deshumanizar a la víctima, lo que con frecuencia es una condición necesaria para que tengan lugar la tortura y los malos tratos.”

 

Por otra parte, el Relator también ha declarado que los Estados no suelen tomar medidas suficientes para evitar dichos actos.76

 

76 A/56/156, apart. 19. Ver también E/CN.4/2001/66/Add.2, apart. 199, E/CN.4/2002/76, anexo III, p. 11, y E/CN.4/2005/62/Add.1, apartados 1019 y 1161.

 

77 Observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos, 18 de noviembre de 2010, UN Doc CCPR/C/SLV/CO/6, apartado 8.

 

78 Para más información ver http://www.glaad.org/search/site/conversion%20therapy?retain-filters=1, visitado por última vez el 28 de agosto de 2013.

 

79 Disponible en: http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

80 (n 26), p. 4.

 

En las observaciones concluyentes del Comité de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos de 2010, se declaró que El Salvador debe investigar exhaustivamente todas las violaciones de derechos humanos atribuidas a agentes de la policía, en especial aquellas que conllevan tortura y malos tratos, así como identificar y procesar a los responsables e imponer no sólo las sanciones disciplinarias pertinentes, sino también, en su caso, sanciones penales proporcionales a la gravedad del delito.77

 

Sin embargo, parece ser que cuando los abusos son cometidos por agentes del Estado de El Salvador, es muy poco probable que, al igual que ocurre con los asesinatos extrajudiciales, se juzgue a los autores.

 

La prohibición de tortura no sólo hace referencia al abuso físico sino también a “actos que causen sufrimiento mental a la víctima”, incluyendo la intimidación. En El Salvador la comunidad transgénero vive bajo una amenaza constante de agresiones físicas: ‘VR’: “Cuando salí del armario… mis padres me enviaron a un psicólogo como último recurso.78 No me di cuenta de que en realidad iba a una terapia de conversión. Cuando comencé, me dio pastillas y medicamentos… pero claro, nunca me curé porque nunca había estado enferma… pero tenía que vivir una vida paralela; la vida delante de mi familia y una vida oculta como lesbiana… mi sueño vital es poder vivir abiertamente con mi pareja, mis amigos, mi familia en algún momento, sin causar ningún problema por vivir abiertamente como soy, y sentir que puedo vivir aquí con seguridad, no por tener un soldado con un arma cargada detrás de mí, que tiende a ser la imagen de paz que se propaga en El Salvador, sino porque vivo una convivencia pacífica con la gente de mi sociedad…”79

 

6.2 Violaciones y Agresiones Sexuales

 

A pesar de que El Salvador registró un fuerte descenso en el número de violaciones denunciadas en 2011, continúa siendo una preocupación omnipresente y seria. En 2011 se denunciaron 326 violaciones a la PNC, un descenso de los 681 casos de 2010. La policía local y los expertos judiciales estiman que sólo se denuncian a las autoridades menos del 20 por ciento de las violaciones.80

 

La violación es considerada por los tribunales como una violación grave de la integridad de la mujer por lo que se puede equiparar a la tortura o a un trato o castigo cruel, inhumano o degradante. En este sentido, el Relator Especial sobre la Tortura, Manfred Nowak, dijo que: “Está ampliamente reconocido, incluso por los antiguos Relatores Especiales sobre tortura y por la jurisprudencia regional, que la violación constituye tortura cuando es infligida o instigada por funcionarios públicos o con su consentimiento o aquiescencia.”81

 

81 Informe del Relator Especial sobre la Tortura ante el Consejo de Derechos Humanos, 15 de enero de 2008, A/HRC/7/3, apartado 36

 

82 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15.

 

83 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15.

 

84 Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, Aydin contra Turquía, Comunicado 23178/94, 25 de septiembre de 1997.

 

85 Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, Zontul contra Grecia, número de solicitud 12294/07, 17 de enero de 2012.

 

86 Martin Mejía contra Perú Nº 5/96 Informe Anual de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, 1995, nº del caso 10,970, Informe 5/96, 1 de marzo de 1996.

 

87 Ibid.

 

En El Salvador, mujeres lesbianas y transgénero han sido violadas por agentes de la policía mientras estaban bajo custodia policial.82 Además, dado que El Salvador alberga a las mujeres lesbianas y transgénero en las cárceles y prisiones de hombres, están sometidas a un alto riesgo de violencia sexual, incluyendo la violación.83 La gravedad de estos delitos y el sufrimiento causado son destacados por la jurisprudencia siguiente.

 

El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH) sostuvo que la violación de detenidos puede constituir tortura. El Tribunal así lo sostuvo en el caso de Aydin contra Turquía, en el cual una mujer fue detenida por la policía, desnudada, golpeada, rociada con chorros de agua fría de alta presión y violada con los ojos vendados.84 Más recientemente en 2012, el TEDH señaló en el caso de Zontul contra Grecia que la víctima había sido objeto de penetración forzada, lo que le había causado un agudo dolor físico. El Tribunal reiteró que la violación de un detenido por un funcionario del Estado debía ser considerada como una forma especialmente grave y aborrecible de malos tratos. El TEDH sostuvo que, en vistas de su crueldad y su carácter intencional, el trato del que había sido objeto el Sr. Zontul era, sin duda, un acto de tortura.85

 

Además, la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos ha clasificado la violación como tortura en el caso de Martin de Mejía contra Perú86 basándose al menos en parte en el sufrimiento físico y mental que se le había infligido como una forma de violencia para castigar e intimidar a la víctima.87

 

6.3 El derecho a la Libertad y a la Seguridad de la Persona

 

Incidentes documentados de detenciones arbitrarias en El Salvador, incluyendo las de personas LGBTI, constituyen violaciones del Artículo 9(1) del PIDCP y el Artículo 7(3) de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos. La policía de El Salvador ha intentado extorsionar favores sexuales de la comunidad LGBTI y los profesionales del sexo LGBTI están sometidos a un acoso particular.88 Un joven homosexual, Carlos, contó cómo un agente de la PNC le hizo detenerse cuando conducía con unos amigos y les hizo comentarios peyorativos sobre su orientación sexual. Después registró el coche y exigió dinero. Cuando Carlos se negó, el agente amenazó con detenerle y dijo: “Si me practicas sexo oral, te dejaré ir.”89

 

88 (n9) p. 15.

 

89 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 15.

 

90 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas lesbianas, gays, bisexuales, transgénero, transexuales, travestis e intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 29.

 

91 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 17.

 

92 (n75), Informe del Comisario de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 17 de noviembre de 2011, apartados 63 y 84 (h).

 

Durante 2010, fue creada la Dirección de Diversidad Sexual dentro de la Secretaría para la Inclusión Social, junto a la aprobación del Decreto Presidencial número 56.90 Sin embargo, una vez más, el informe de la Universidad de Berkeley de julio de 2012 informa que hay una falta de denuncias de delitos por parte de la comunidad LGBTI. Es posible que debido a esta falta de denuncias y la falta de investigaciones, el clima de impunidad esté aún muy presente en todos los delitos y en particular en aquellos en los que las víctimas son miembros de la comunidad LGBTI.91

 

7. DOCUMENTOS DE IDENTIDAD

 

En muchos países, las personas transgénero no consiguen el reconocimiento legal de su género preferido, incluyendo el cambio de sexo y de nombre en los documentos de identidad oficiales. Como consecuencia se encuentran con muchas dificultades prácticas, como a la hora de solicitar empleo, de buscar una vivienda, para pedir un crédito o ayudas estatales o incluso cuando viajan al extranjero. Por ello el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU ha instado a los Estados a reconocer el derecho de las personas transgénero a cambiar su sexo al permitir la emisión de un nuevo certificado de nacimiento y ha tomado nota con la aprobación de la legislación para facilitar el reconocimiento legal de un cambio de sexo.92

 

Las personas transgénero en El Salvador tienen dificultades a la hora de cambiar de sexo en los documentos de identidad oficiales. En El Salvador, es indispensable contar con un documento de identidad salvadoreño para poder desenvolverse en muchos aspectos de la sociedad salvadoreña. Sin embargo las personas transgénero no están legalmente autorizadas a cambiar su nombre o identidad de género.93 Esto afecta gravemente a su acceso a oportunidades de empleo. Además, aunque el documento de identidad cuenta con un lugar para un nombre alternativo, las personas transgénero han denunciado que se les ha negado el uso de esta particularidad para poder registrar su verdadera identidad de género.94

 

93 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 26.

 

94 Entrevista de Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana con Suyuri y Alejandra de COMCAVIS TRANS en “La Diversidad Sexual en El Salvador: un informe sobre la situación de los derechos humanos de la comunidad LGBT” julio de 2012, Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), disponible en http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/LGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf, visitado por última vez el 15 de abril de 2013, p. 44.

 

95 Informe sobre los Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres Trans en El Salvador, abril de 2012, Programa de la ONU para el Desarrollo, páginas 11 y 12.

 

En ausencia de una institución encargada de integrar y sistematizar toda las estadísticas sobre la violencia por motivos de género, varios organismos, entre los que están el Instituto Médico Forense, el Instituto Salvadoreño para el Desarrollo de la Mujer y la Procuraduría General, recaban su propia información utilizando distintas metodologías y categorización de los tipos de violencia por motivos de género. La existencia de múltiples estadísticas divergentes, a menudo conduce a la fragmentación y la duplicación de datos y por lo tanto a información engañosa.

 

Los siguientes datos ponen de relieve los problemas con respecto a la identidad a los que se enfrentan las personas transgénero:

 

El 89% de las mujeres trans se identifica con un nombre femenino.

 

El 42% dice que han tenido problemas o inconvenientes para cambiar su nombre.

 

El 70% tiene dificultad para tramitar sus documentos estatales.

 

El 44.8% tiene problemas para pedir un cambio de nombre.

 

El 19.3% de la población salvadoreña está de acuerdo en que las mujeres trans tienen derecho a documentos de identidad que las identifique como mujeres.

 

El 84.6% de los funcionarios de El Salvador no cree que la identidad de género sea una condición que tenga que ser tratada o “corregida” y apoyan las reformas del sistema judicial para identificar a las mujeres trans.95

 

8. DISCRIMINACIÓN

 

Además de la violación de sus derechos civiles y políticos, la comunidad LGBTI en El Salvador se ve sometida a la discriminación de sus derechos económicos, sociales y culturales. Esto incluye la discriminación por parte de actores privados; por ejemplo, ciertas empresas no ofrecen servicios ni venden sus bienes ni servicios a personas LGBTI debido a su orientación sexual.96

 

96 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas lesbianas, gays, bisexuales, transgénero, transexuales, travestis e intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 27.

 

97 Comité de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, observación general nº 18 (E/C.12/GC/18), apartado 12 (b) (i).

 

98 Comité de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, observación general nº 18 (E/C.12/GC/18), apartado 12 (b) (i). Ver también las observaciones concluyentes del Comité de Derechos Humanos de los Estados Unidos de América (CCPR/C/USA/CO/3/Rev.1), apartado 33.

 

99 Homofobia de Estado: un estudio mundial sobre las leyes que penalizan los actos sexuales consentidos entre personas adultas del mismo sexo, Asociación Internacional de Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Transgénero e Intersexo (ILGA), Bruselas, mayo de 2011, páginas 12-13.

 

100 X contra Colombia (CCPR/C/89/D/1361/2005), apartados 7.2-7.3; Young contra Australia (CCPR/C/78/D/941/2000), apartados 10-12.

 

En los siguientes apartados se analizan otras formas por las que se violan los derechos sociales, económicos y culturales de la comunidad LGBTI.

 

8.1 Discriminación en el Trabajo

 

En virtud del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos, los Estados están obligados a proteger a las personas de cualquier discriminación en el acceso o conservación de un empleo.

 

El Comité de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales ha confirmado que el Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (PIDESC) “proscribe toda discriminación en el acceso al empleo y en la conservación del mismo por motivos de orientación sexual”.97 Según el Comité, “constituye una violación del Pacto toda discriminación en materia de acceso al mercado de trabajo o a los medios y prestaciones que permiten conseguir trabajo.”98

 

Cincuenta y cuatro Estados cuentan con legislación que prohíbe la discriminación en el empleo basada en la orientación sexual.99 En ausencia de tal legislación, los empleadores pueden despedir o negarse a contratar o a ascender a personas simplemente porque se cree que son homosexuales o transgénero.

 

Es importante destacar que los beneficios que obtienen los empleados heterosexuales pueden ser negados a sus homólogos LGBTI – desde permisos de aternidad/maternidad o permisos familiares hasta la participación en planes de pensiones y de seguros de salud. En X contra Colombia y Young contra Australia, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU declaró que el no proporcionar una pensión a una pareja no casada del mismo sexo, cuando se otorgó a una pareja no casada de heterosexuales, fue una violación de los derechos otorgados por el PIDCP.100

 

Mientras que el Decreto Presidencial 56 de El Salvador prohíbe la discriminación basada en la identidad de género o en la orientación
sexual en el sector público, no existe tal disposición legal o constitucional en materia del empleo en el sector privado; y activistas han denunciado que los empleadores discriminan libremente a las personas LGBTI en dicho sector.101

 

101 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 41.

 

102 Entrevista de Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana con Suyuri y Alejandra de COMCAVIS TRANS en “La Diversidad Sexual en El Salvador: un informe sobre la situación de los derechos humanos de la comunidad LGBT” julio de 2012, Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic (Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), disponible en http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/LGBT_Report_English_Final_120705.pdf, visitado por última vez el 15 de abril de 2013, p. 42.

 

103 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 42.

 

104 Informe de hechos de agresión hacia la comunidad de personas Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Transgénero, Transexuales, Travestis e Intersexuales en El Salvador durante el año 2010, p. 26.

 

105 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 41.

 

La falta de acceso a oportunidades laborales y la libre discriminación da lugar a que un número desproporcionado de personas de la comunidad LGBTI, en particular mujeres transexuales, se conviertan en trabajadores del sexo, dejándolos vulnerables a la violencia y aumentando desproporcionadamente sus probabilidades de contraer el VIH.102 Esto crea un círculo vicioso por el cual se suele pensar que las personas LGBTI tienen más posibilidades de estar contagiadas por el VIH, y por tanto se las discrimina por su estado seropositivo.103

 

En El Salvador las personas LGBTI suelen tener que actuar de cierta manera con el fin de no ser objeto de discriminación. Se ha dicho que las mujeres lesbianas a menudo dicen sufrir acoso sexual por parte de sus superiores si se descubre su homosexualidad y a veces son sometidas a la “violación de la conversión”. Además, trabajadores LGBTI también denuncian que su orientación sexual es un factor utilizado para su explotación laboral, con amenazas de ser expuestos si no están de acuerdo con las horas extraordinarias.104

 

8.2 Discriminación en la Educación

 

El Artículo 58 de la Constitución de El Salvador prescribe que “ningún centro educativo podrá negarse a admitir alumnos por motivo de la naturaleza de la unión de sus progenitores o tutores, ni por diferencias sociales, religiosas, raciales o políticas.”105 La Constitución no menciona otros motivos sobre los que se basa la prohibición, en particular la orientación sexual, la identidad de género y la expresión de género.

 

El ACNUDH ha señalado que los jóvenes LGBTI sufren a menudo violencia y acoso, incluyendo el acoso escolar por parte de sus compañeros y profesores.106 Enfrentarse a este tipo de prejuicios e intimidación requiere esfuerzos conjuntos por parte de los colegios y las autoridades educativas así como la integración de principios de no discriminación y de diversidad en los planes de estudio y en los discursos sobre educación. Los medios de comunicación también juegan un papel a la hora de eliminar los estereotipos negativos de las personas LGBTI, incluyendo los programas de televisión más populares entre los jóvenes. Un ámbito que también preocupa y que está relacionado es la educación sexual.107 El Relator Especial dijo con respecto al derecho a la educación que “para ser completa, la educación sexual debe prestar especial atención a la diversidad ya que todo el mundo tiene derecho a ocuparse de su propia sexualidad.”108

 

106 (n75), Informe del Comisario de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 17 de noviembre de 2011, apartado 58.

 

107 Ibid.

 

108 Informe del Relator Especial de la ONU sobre el Derecho a la Educación, 23 de julio de 2010, UN Doc A/65/16 apartado 23.

 

109 Artículo 13 (2) (a).

 

110 Artículo 13 (2) (b y c).

 

111 Ratificada por el El Salvador el 10 de julio de 1990.

 

112 Comité de los Derechos del Niño de la ONU, Observación General nº 4 (2003) La salud y el desarrollo de los adolescentes en el contexto de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. UN Doc CRC/GC/2003/4, apart. 6.

 

113 Artículo 13 (2).

 

El derecho a la educación está consagrado en el Artículo 13 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (PIDESC)109 y requiere específicamente que los estados proporcionen educación primaria obligatoria, y garantizar la educación secundaria además de proporcionar una educación superior “al alcance de todos por igual.”110

 

El Artículo 29 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño111 de la ONU también prevé con respecto a la educación de los niños. Las observaciones generales del Comité sobre los Derechos del Niño hacen referencia a la discriminación: “Los Estados Partes tienen la obligación de garantizar a todos los seres humanos de menos de 18 años el disfrute de todos los derechos enunciados en la Convención, sin distinción alguna (art. 2), independientemente de “la raza, el color, el sexo, el idioma, la religión, la opinión política o de otra índole, el origen nacional, étnico o social, los impedimentos físicos, el nacimiento o cualquier otra condición del niño”. Deben añadirse también la orientación sexual y el estado de salud de los adolescentes (con inclusión del VIH/SIDA y la salud mental).”112

 

El Protocolo de San Salvador se hace eco del derecho a la educación y lo señala como un medio para que todos los miembros de la sociedad “logren una existencia digna.”113

 

Informes recientes indican que a diario seis personas son infectadas por el VIH en El Salvador. Aunque la educación sexual se enseña en el sistema educativo público, el programa de la asignatura suele basarse en la abstinencia.114 Mientras que ha habido varios intentos de introducir un programa de educación sexual que trate el tema de las prácticas sexuales seguras, sus defensores denuncian que los colegios, por lo general, no han implantado dichos programas. Es más, la educación sobre orientación sexual e identidad de género en la educación pública es prácticamente inexistente. El representante de una ONG achaca el fracaso del Estado para adoptar un enfoque más exhaustivo de la educación sexual y de los derechos reproductivos a la influencia de la Iglesia Católica y otros grupos religiosos de la sociedad salvadoreña, que adoptan una postura conservadora en cuanto a estos temas.115

 

Además, debido a una combinación de presión por parte de la Iglesia y de la burocracia gubernamental, los defensores informaron de una falta de acceso a los preservativos y señaló que las ONG locales proporcionaron la mayoría de los preservativos distribuidos al público.116

 

114 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 30.

 

115 Ibid.

 

116 Ibid.

 

117 Mesa redonda de la comunidad LGBT en San Salvador, (22 de febrero de 2011) en (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 40.

 

118 Entrevista de Karla Stephanie Avelar Orellana con Suyuri y Alejandra de COMCAVIS TRANS en (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 42.

 

Otro activista informó de que las mujeres lesbianas, en especial aquellas que tienen una apariencia más masculina, sufren formas de discriminación y de exclusión similares. Una estudiante de medicina declaró: “Si cambiamos nuestra apariencia, se nos acepta más… si no, dicen ‘mira ahí llega ese maricón’…” – Sayuri, una mujer transgénero que iba a la universidad vestida como un hombre, y que lo calificó como una forma de “discriminación significativa”.117

 

Representantes de una organización de la sociedad civil identificó la discriminación transgénero como un problema acuciante en la educación superior. Declararon que, en lugar de soportar un trato discriminatorio o la experiencia degradante de fingir ser heterosexual, muchas personas LGBTI abandonan sus estudios.118

 

8.3 Discriminación en la atención sanitaria

 

El Artículo 2 de la Constitución de El Salvador garantiza a sus ciudadanos el derecho a la vida. Una consecuencia directa de esta garantía es el derecho a la salud, lo cual obliga al Estado a proporcionar una atención sanitaria adecuada. El Artículo 3 de la Constitución prohíbe la discriminación basada en el sexo y establece que todas las personas son iguales ante la ley. Además, el Código de Sanidad salvadoreño prohíbe la discriminación en la atención sanitaria basada en la nacionalidad, religión, raza, credo político o clase social.

 

En marzo de 2009, el Ministro de Salud firmó el Decreto Ministerial 202 que establece que todos los servicios de salud deben facilitar y promover la erradicación de la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual. El Decreto 202 prohíbe expresamente la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual por parte del personal que trabaja en la sanidad pública y exige que se informe sobre las medidas tomadas para reducir la homofobia y la discriminación en el sector sanitario. Además, el Decreto Presidencial 56 prohíbe la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual y la identidad de género en el gobierno, incluyendo el sector sanitario. Ambos decretos proporcionan protección importante, pero tan sólo regulan la discriminación en el sector público.

 

El Documento Marco de Cooperación para apoyar la implementación de la respuesta de Centroamérica al VIH/SIDA entre el gobierno de EEUU y los Estados de Centroamérica, sostiene que el alto nivel de infecciones por el VIH/SIDA se debe, por lo menos en parte, a la discriminación y el estigma que existe en el sistema sanitario de Centroamérica.119

 

119 Marco de Cooperación para apoyar la implementación de la respuesta regional de Centroamérica al VIH/SIDA entre el gobierno de los Estados Unidos y los Gobiernos de la Región Centroamericana (Belice, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua y Panamá. Marzo de 2010.

 

120 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 43.

 

121 La recomendación de la OIT sobre el VIH y el SIDA y el mundo del trabajo, 2010 (nº 200) en http://www.ilo.org/aids/WCMS_142708/lang–es/index.htm

 

122 Ibid en 10.

 

8.4 Discriminación en la atención sanitaria contra personas que viven con el VIH/SIDA

 

Cabe señalar que los investigadores del informe Berkeley también encontraron que la discriminación basada en la infección por el VIH aún prevalece en El Salvador. A pesar de la legislación existente que prohíbe que los empleadores obliguen a sus trabajadores a someterse a la prueba del VIH, en la práctica, es algo que aún sucede, siendo los principales infractores los empleadores privados que exigen una prueba de VIH como prerrequisito para la contratación y/o permanencia en un empleo. Además, trabajadores que solicitan horas libres para citas médicas han sido investigados por sus empleadores y finalmente despedidos por ser seropositivos o sospechosos de serlo.120

 

La recomendación de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT) sobre el VIH y el SIDA y el mundo del trabajo, 2010 (nº 200)121 establece que no debe haber discriminación o estigmatización contra empleados, en especial los solicitantes o demandantes de empleo, por motivos de estado serológico real o supuesto.122 También establece que el estado serológico, real o supuesto, respecto del VIH no debe ser un motivo para terminar la relación de trabajo. Las ausencias temporales del trabajo motivadas por la necesidad de prestar cuidados a terceros o por enfermedad relacionadas con el VIH o el SIDA deben tratarse de la misma manera que las ausencias por otras razones de salud.123

 

123 Ibid en 11.

 

124 Ibid en 37 (d).

 

125 Ibid en 37 (f).

 

126 Informe UNGASS de 2010.

 

127 Ibid.

 

La OIT también ha recomendado que los estados miembro garanticen la colaboración y la coordinación entre las autoridades públicas y los servicios públicos y privados pertinentes, incluidos los programas de prestaciones de seguros o de otro tipo;124 asimismo deben fomentar el diálogo social y otras formas de cooperación entre las autoridades gubernamentales, los empleadores públicos y privados y los trabajadores y sus representantes, teniendo en cuenta las posturas adoptadas por el personal de los servicios de salud en el trabajo, los especialistas en el VIH y el SIDA y otras partes interesadas.125

 

De acuerdo con los datos presentados por el Ministerio de Sanidad y de Asistencia Social, a través del Programa Nacional de VIH/SIDA, el Informe sobre la Situación del VIH en El Salvador hasta noviembre de 2009 indica que se han registrado 23.731 casos de VIH y SIDA desde 1984. De ellos, 15.087 (65.58%) han sido identificados como casos de VIH y 8.644 (36.42%) como casos de SIDA. De ellos, el 62.74% de los afectados eran hombres y el 37.26% mujeres.126

 

Las características de la enfermedad indican que es una epidemia que se concentra en zonas más vulnerables y afecta sobre todo a los hombres. Por lo general afecta principalmente a la población joven, financieramente activa y que tiende a asentarse en grandes zonas urbanas. Desde enero de 2004 y hasta noviembre de 2009, la tasa media anual de nuevos casos de VIH era de 1.443 nuevos casos, mientras que la tasa media anual de nuevos casos de SIDA era de 406.127

Con respecto a las tasas de VIH, el Informe Anual para el Estudio de Estigma y Discriminación en Personas con VIH en El Salvador en 2009, detallaba los resultados de 688 encuestas cumplimentadas por gente con VIH de tres regiones de El Salvador. Algunas estadísticas relevantes incluyen:

 

. El 57.9% de los encuestados dijeron estar desempleados.

 

. El 47.4% de los encuestados viven en la pobreza.

 

. El 17% de los encuestados dijeron pertenecer a una “minoría sexual”.

 

Las reacciones más negativas al conocer la infección por VIH procedían de los familiares, vecinos o líderes de la comunidad local:

 

. El 48.4% de los encuestados de grupos minoritarios se culpaban a sí mismos de su condición.

 

. El 35.8% de los encuestados de grupos minoritarios se sienten avergonzados.

 

. El 33.6% de los encuestados de grupos minoritarios tienen miedo a ser acosados o agredidos verbalmente.128

 

128 Programa de la Naciones Unidas Para el Desarrollo, El Salvador (PNUD). Informe Anual para el Estudio de Estigma y Discriminación en Personas con VIH en El Salvador en 2009.

 

129 Informe de la Relatora Especial sobre la violencia contra la mujer, sus causas y consecuencias, Rashida Manjoo. Misión de seguimiento de El Salvador, 17-19 de marzo de 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/17/26/Add.2 p.6 apart. 13.

 

Esta encuesta pone de relieve que el VIH/SIDA afecta de manera desproporcionada a gente de “minorías sexuales” así como la cantidad de vergüenza que sienten estas personas con respecto a su condición.

 

9. TRATO EQUITATIVO ENTRE HOMBRES Y MUJERES

 

La Relatora Especial para la Violencia contra la Mujer, sus Causas y Consecuencias, indicó en su informe del 14 de febrero de 2011 que El Salvador continúa “enfrentándose a retos importantes en la esfera de la violencia contra las mujeres y las niñas. La impunidad de los delitos, las disparidades socioeconómicas y la cultura machista siguen favoreciendo un estado generalizado de violencia en el que la mujer está sometida a una serie continuada de actos múltiples de violencia, como el asesinato, la violación, la violencia doméstica, el acoso sexual y la explotación sexual comercial.”129

 

El Instituto Nacional para el Desarrollo de la Mujer reconoció en su primer informe nacional sobre la situación de la violencia contra la mujer que El Salvador había hecho caso omiso y socavado la capacidad de penetración de este fenómeno, haciendo que el sufrimiento de las mujeres y la impunidad que rodea a la violencia sea casi invisible y quede sin denunciar. Las razones por esa falta de denuncias son múltiples: presión familiar y de la comunidad para no revelar problemas domésticos; dependencia económica; temor a represalias violentas por parte de la pareja; escaso conocimiento entre las víctimas sobre sus derechos; la falta de servicios de apoyo suficientes; la poca confianza en el sistema judicial, principalmente como resultado de las respuestas discriminatorias y la falta de coherencia en la aplicación e interpretación de la ley.

 

En una reciente declaración del 25 de noviembre de 2009, que tuvo lugar durante su discurso de conmemoración del Día Internacional para la Eliminación de la Violencia contra la Mujer, el Presidente Funes (presidente de El Salvador) dijo que cualquier funcionario que se viese involucrado en incidentes de acoso sexual sería despedido.

 

El Comité de América Latina y El Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM) en El Salvador indica que, a pesar de que se han logrado algunos avances, como la Política Nacional de la Mujer y la Ley contra la violencia doméstica, en El Salvador continúa predominando una visión sexista de las mujeres, que se ve claramente en las muertes de mujeres a las que no se les ha dado la importancia que merecen.130 CLADEM recomienda que se cree un mecanismo nacional de estadísticas sobre las muertes de mujeres para hacer frente a este problema.131

 

130 Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU, Resumen de las presentaciones de 9 grupos interesados para el Examen Periódico Universal del 25 de noviembre de 2009, UN Doc A/HRC/WG.6/7/SLV/3. Resumen de la presentación por parte del Comité de América Latina y El Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer CLADEM, apartado 15.

 

131 Ibid.

 

132 Ibid.

 

133 Ibid.

 

134 Observación General No. 16 del Comité de los Derechos Humanos de la ONU, Observaciones generales y recomendaciones generales adoptadas por los Órganos del Tratado de Derechos Humanos, U.N. Doc. HRI/GEN/1/Rev.7 at 162 (1988), apartado 1.

 

Por otro lado, la PDDH sostiene que el Estado no ha adoptado medidas efectivas para prevenir y sancionar la violencia contra las mujeres. Desde 2001 hasta mayo de 2009, se registraron 2.660 asesinatos de mujeres, muchos de los cuales permanecen bajo investigación e impunes.132 El PDDH también indica que entre 2002 y 2008 se interpusieron 5.869 denuncias por acoso sexual; el 88 por ciento de estos acosos fueron contra mujeres.133

 

10. DERECHO A LA INTIMIDAD DE LA PERSONALIDAD JURÍDICA

 

Los Artículos 16 y 17 del PIDCP reconocen respectivamente los derechos a la personalidad jurídica y a la intimidad. Según el Artículo 16 todo ser humano tiene “derecho, en todas partes, al reconocimiento de su personalidad jurídica.” El Artículo 17 (1) establece que “nadie será objeto de injerencias arbitrarias o ilegales en su vida privada, su familia, su domicilio o su correspondencia, ni de ataques ilegales a su honra y reputación.”

 

El Artículo 17 (2) añade que “toda persona tiene derecho a la protección de la ley contra esas injerencias o esos ataques.”

 

En su Observación General 16 de 1988, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU ha declarado que el Artículo 17 del PIDCP ofrece protección, entre otras cosas, a la honra y la reputación y que: “este derecho debe estar garantizado respecto de todas esas injerencias y ataques, provengan de las autoridades estatales o de personas físicas o jurídicas. Las obligaciones impuestas por este artículo exigen que el Estado adopte medidas legislativas y de otra índole para hacer efectivas la prohibición de esas injerencias y ataques y la protección de este derecho.”134

 

En la decisión histórica de Toonen contra Australia de 1994, el Comité consideró que las leyes que penalizan los actos homosexuales consentidos violan expresamente la protección de la privacidad del Artículo 17.1 del PIDCP.135

 

135 Toonen contra Australia, CCPR/C/50/D/488/1992, Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU (HRC), 4 de abril de 1994, apartados 8.2 y 11.

 

136 Entrevistas con miembros de grupos de defensa y un activista LGBTI en (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 26.

 

137 Ibid.

 

Unidos, los Artículos 16 y 17 del PIDCP crean una obligación para que los Estados reconozcan el género auto-identificado de las personas transgénero.

 

En El Salvador se requiere que todas las personas tengan registrada su situación jurídica. La situación jurídica es equiparada a la personalidad jurídica, y el Estado emite documentos de identidad basándose en ello. Sin embargo, como El Salvador se niega a reconocer el género auto-identificado de las personas transgénero, estas personas son a menudo incapaces de obtener documentos de identidad adecuados, negándoles efectivamente la condición de persona jurídica como exige el derecho internacional.

 

Cuando una persona transgénero carece de personalidad jurídica, se convierte en una persona indocumentada. Esto quiere decir, por ejemplo, que si una mujer transgénero sufre algún tipo de violencia, el Estado sólo puede documentar dicha violencia bajo su nombre legal, el nombre masculino con el que se le registró al nacer. Esto tiene como efecto la denegación de su acceso a muchos servicios importantes, como la asistencia disponible para las mujeres a través de la seguridad social.

 

Dado que la apariencia física de las personas transgénero y sus nombres rara vez coinciden con su documento de identidad, a menudo son rechazados por los proveedores de ciertos servicios como los hospitales. Como se ha mencionado en la página 15, el informe Berkeley confirma que las personas transgénero no pueden cambiar su nombre o sexo legalmente en sus documentos de identidad para reflejar su identidad de género.136

 

Es más, la discrepancia entre la fotografía de su carnet de identidad y su apariencia también llama la atención sobre su identidad transgénero. Según han denunciado activistas, una vez que estas personas son identificadas como personas transgénero, a menudo se les hace esperar mucho tiempo o se les niega la atención por completo.137

 

Jurisprudencia importante del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH) proporciona orientación sobre la interpretación de estos derechos. En Goodwin contra Reino Unido, el TEDH reconoció las dificultades que supuso la falta de reconocimiento del género. El Tribunal manifestó:

 

“El estrés y aislamiento resultante de una discordancia entre la posición asumida dentro de la sociedad por un transexual tras la operación y el estatus impuesto por la ley que se niega a reconocer el cambio de sexo no puede ser considerado, según el Tribunal, como un pequeño inconveniente que surge de una formalidad. Un conflicto entre la realidad social y la ley que coloca al transexual en una posición anómala en la cual puede sentir vulnerabilidad, humillación y ansiedad.”138

 

138 Goodwin c. Reino Unido, Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos Solicitud nº 28957/95, 11 de julio de 2002, apart. 77

 

139 Goodwin c. Reino Unido, Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos Solicitud nº 28957/95, 11 de julio de 2002.

 

140 (n 75), Informe del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 17 de noviembre de 2011, apart. 73.

 

El Tribunal consideró que Reino Unido había violado el derecho del demandante a la privacidad al revelar su identidad de género anterior además de violar otros derechos como el derecho al matrimonio.139 El demandante en Goodwin era una persona transgénero postoperada, de hombre a mujer, y gran parte del lenguaje utilizado en la decisión del Tribunal precisa la relevancia de la condición de postoperatorio.

 

El Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU también expresó su preocupación por la falta de acuerdos que otorguen reconocimiento legal a las identidades de las personas transgénero. Ha instado a los Estados a reconocer el derecho de las personas transgénero a cambiar de sexo con la emisión de un certificado de nacimiento nuevo y ha tomado nota con la aprobación de la legislación para facilitar el reconocimiento legal de un cambio de sexo.140

 

Sin embargo, las personas en El Salvador tienen un acceso limitado a recursos laborales y sanitarios, poniendo fuera del alcance de las personas transgénero la posibilidad de una cirugía de reasignación de sexo. Como tal, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU debería considerar basarse en la jurisprudencia del TEDH y ampliarla reconociendo que existe una falta de personalidad jurídica para las personas transgénero en El Salvador, violando así las obligaciones que en virtud del Artículo 16 del PIDCP tiene el Estado, y que esto es un hecho independientemente de si la persona transgénero se ha sometido a una operación de cambio de sexo o no.

 

10.1 Las preocupaciones de las mujeres transexuales

 

Como resultado de los debates mantenidos con la población transgénero de El Salvador sobre los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio de la ONU para 2015, organizados por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo, se pusieron de relieve algunas preocupaciones. Entre las cuales estaban:

 

. Se requiere una ley que permita a la población transgénero elegir su sexualidad;

 

. Las personas transgénero necesitan acceso a la educación sin ser objeto de discriminación;

 

. Existe una falta de acceso al empleo para las personas transgénero tanto en el sector público como en el privado, por consiguiente la mayoría terminan siendo peluqueros o profesionales del sexo;

 

. Las personas transgénero consideran que existe una falta de acceso a la justicia y una necesidad de mejorar la seguridad porque sufren la violación de sus derechos;

 

. Lo más importante es que las personas transgénero quieren ser reconocidas.141

 

141 Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (2012) Las mujeres piden el reconocimiento por parte del gobierno y de la población de la identidad de género transexual, disponible en: http://www.pnud.org.sv/2007/content/view/1500/, visitado por última vez el 27 de julio de 2013.

 

142 Informe del Relator Especial sobre la situación de los defensores de los derechos humanos, Margaret Sekaggya, 20 de diciembre de 2010, UN Doc A/HRC/16/44. apartado 37.

 

143 Ibid. Apartado 39.

 

144 Ibid. Apartado 39

 

145 Ibid. Apartado 85.

 

10.2 Libertad de expresión, asociación y reunión

 

En virtud del Artículo 19 del PIDCP, “toda persona tiene derecho a la libertad de expresión; este derecho comprende la libertad de buscar, recibir y difundir informaciones e ideas de toda índole, sin consideración de fronteras, ya sea oralmente, por escrito o en forma impresa o artística, o por cualquier otro procedimiento de su elección.”

 

Los abusos contra los derechos humanos con respecto a las personas LGBTI en El Salvador se han manifestado en los asesinatos, agresiones y discriminación en relación con los servicios básicos como se ha descrito anteriormente.

 

A nivel más general, el Relator Especial dijo sobre la situación en 2010 de los defensores de los derechos humanos, que este tipo de discriminación contra personas LGBTI es un problema mundial y que muchas de las comunicaciones (un total de 196) enviadas durante el periodo de referencia eran relativas a distintos Estados y hacían mención a supuestas violaciones contra defensores, incluidos hombres, que trabajaban en temas de derechos de la mujer y de género, incluyendo casos de personas lesbianas, gays, bisexuales y transexuales.142

 

También se observó que en las Américas, de donde procedían 51 de las comunicaciones del Relator Especial, las comunicaciones trataban sobre todo de amenazas, amenazas de muerte, agresiones físicas, asesinatos e intentos de asesinato.143 Los presuntos autores eran denunciados por lo general como personas desconocidas o no identificadas, en ocasiones armadas, a menudo con vínculos conocidos con actores no estatales, incluyendo los paramilitares.144

 

La reputación personal de los defensores que apoyan los derechos relacionados con el género y la sexualidad ha sido desafiada y difamada, incluso a través de denuncias relacionadas con su orientación sexual, esforzándose por suprimir su defensa.145

 

El asesinato de Tania Vásquez en El Salvador, una defensora de los derechos humanos, a principios de este año (ver nota 61 arriba), junto con indicios de agresiones, tortura, malos tratos y discriminación contra personas LGBTI pone en evidencia cómo la libertad de expresión en relación a personas LGBTI en El Salvador también está amenazada.

 

11. VIDA FAMILIAR

 

El Artículo 23 del PIDCP establece que “la familia es el elemento natural y fundamental de la sociedad y tiene derecho a la protección de la sociedad y del Estado.” En Observaciones Concluyentes anteriores, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU ha acogido con satisfacción el reconocimiento legal de las uniones civiles entre personas del mismo sexo y ha pedido a los Estados que concedan los mismos beneficios a las parejas de homosexuales no casadas que los que ya existen para parejas no casadas de heterosexuales.146

 

146 Comité de Derechos Humanos, Observaciones Concluyentes, Japón, 29 UN Doc CCPR/C/JPN/CO/5, 18 de diciembre de 2008.

 

147 (n 67), Informe del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 17 de noviembre de 2011, apart. 66 y nota 128.

 

148 Ver (n 79)

 

149 Karen Atala e Hijas c. Chile, Caso 1271-04, nº informe 42/08, OEA/Ser.L/V/II.130 Doc. 22, rev. 1 (2008).

 

Mientras que las familias y las comunidades suelen ser una fuente importante de apoyo, las actitudes discriminatorias en el seno de las familias y las comunidades también pueden inhibir la capacidad de las personas LGBTI para disfrutar de toda la gama de derechos humanos. Esta discriminación se manifiesta de varias maneras, incluyendo a través de la exclusión de estas personas del hogar familiar, ser desheredadas, prohibirlas acudir al colegio, ser enviadas a instituciones psiquiátricas, obligadas a casarse, obligadas a renunciar a sus hijos, ser castigadas por su labor activista y ser sometidas a ataques contra su reputación personal. En muchos casos, las lesbianas y mujeres bisexuales, así como las personas transgénero están especialmente en riesgo debido a las arraigadas desigualdades de género que limitan la autonomía en la toma de decisiones sobre la sexualidad, la reproducción y la vida familiar.147

 

En este informe se afirma que dichas actitudes discriminatorias existen en El Salvador, como se recalca en la narración de una mujer lesbiana en El Salvador en la página 14 de este documento.148

 

Las actitudes discriminatorias, en ocasiones, también se ven reflejadas en las decisiones sobre la custodia de los niños. Por ejemplo, un caso de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos de una madre lesbiana y sus hijas que buscaban una rectificación de la decisión de las autoridades chilenas que le negaron a la madre lesbiana la custodia de sus hijas basándose en su orientación sexual.149

 

Para tomar la decisión, la Corte Interamericana determinó que el peso de la autoridad internacional deja claro que la discriminación en base a la orientación sexual viola derechos humanos protegidos y que no existe ninguna justificación para que los tribunales consideren la orientación sexual de los padres al tomar decisiones sobre custodias.

 

11.1 La falta de reconocimiento de las relaciones y el acceso relacionado con beneficios estatales y otros

 

El Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU ha señalado que, en virtud del derecho internacional, no se exige a los Estados que permitan contraer matrimonio a las parejas del mismo sexo.150 Sin embargo, la obligación de proteger a las personas de la discriminación basándose en la orientación sexual garantiza que las parejas no casadas del mismo sexo sean tratadas de la misma manera y con derecho a los mismos beneficios que las parejas no casadas de sexos opuestos.151

 

150 Ver Joslin c. Nueva Zelanda (CCPR/C/75/D/902/1999), 10 IHRR 40 (2003).

 

151 Ver Young c. Australia (CCPR/C/78/D/941/2000), apart. 10.4.

 

152 (n 75), Informe del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, 17 de noviembre de 2011, p. 22, apart 69.

 

153 Disponible en http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

154 Disponible en http://danielleinelsalvador.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/historical-moments-lgbt-community-in-el.html, visitado por última vez el 20 de julio de 2013.

 

En algunos países, el Estado proporciona beneficios a parejas tanto casadas como no de heterosexuales, pero se los deniega a las parejas de homosexuales no casadas. Ejemplos de estos beneficios son el derecho a una pensión, la posibilidad de dejar una propiedad a la pareja sobreviviente, la posibilidad de permanecer en una vivienda de protección oficial tras el fallecimiento de la pareja o la posibilidad de conseguir la residencia de una pareja extranjera. La falta de reconocimiento oficial de las relaciones del mismo sexo y la ausencia de prohibición legal contra la discriminación pueden derivar en la discriminación de parejas del mismo sexo por parte de actores, incluyendo proveedores de servicios de salud y empresas aseguradoras.152

 

La falta de reconocimiento de la validez de las relaciones del mismo sexo en El Salvador, y como resultado la desvalorización de las personas en estas relaciones, tiene un fuerte impacto en el derecho a una vida familiar de la comunidad LGBTI. En su blog sobre El Salvador, Grit and Grace, Danielle Mackey publicó en agosto de 2012 una entrevista con dos activistas de la comunidad de lesbianas salvadoreña, Verónica Reyna y Andrea Ayala así como con la Alianza de Gays y Lesbianas contra la Difamación (GLAAD, por sus siglas en inglés).153 En esta entrevista, ambas activistas hablaron de actitudes negativas que habían experimentado cuando manifestaron su condición. En el caso de Andrea Ayala, dicha actitud incluía ser enviada a un psicólogo y ser recetada con medicinas para intentar ‘curarla’. Sin embargo, ella dice, “Claro que nunca me curé porque nunca estuve enferma y amo a las mujeres, pero tenía que vivir una vida paralela; la vida delante de mi familia y una vida oculta como lesbiana, en la que tenía que escapar del instituto para ir a ver a mi novia.”154

 

Esto demuestra que ser LGBTI no sólo afecta a la familia más inmediata de una persona, sino también a su capacidad para mantener una relación de su elección.

 

12. PROTECCIÓN ESPECIAL PARA LOS NIÑOS

 

El Artículo 24(1) del PIDCP establece que todo niño “tiene derecho a las medidas de protección que su condición de menor requiere, tanto por parte de su familia como de la sociedad y del Estado”. Además, se confirma que El Salvador ha ratificado la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño de la ONU, y según las Observaciones Generales del Comité de los Derechos del Niño, los derechos establecidos en la Convención no deben ser objeto de ningún tipo de discriminación, incluidas la orientación sexual y el VIH/SIDA.155

 

Los jóvenes LGBTI en El Salvador necesitan protección especial. Los colegios no ofrecen información sobre los conceptos de orientación sexual o identidad de género, sino que suelen reforzar el estereotipo cultural. Lo único que se consigue con esto es excluir y marginar a la comunidad LGBTI desde una edad muy temprana.55

 

Comité de los Derechos del Niño de la ONU, Observación General nº 4 (2003) La salud y el desarrollo de los adolescentes en el contexto de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. UN Doc CRC/GC/2003/4, apart. 6.

 

156 Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU, Resumen de las presentaciones de 9 grupos interesados para el Examen Periódico Universal del 25 de noviembre de 2009, UN Doc A/HRC/WG.6/7/SLV/3. Resumen de la presentación hecha por el Comité de América Latina y El Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM), apart. 43.

 

157 Comité de América Latina y El Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM), p.2 apart. 9.

 

158 Programa Nacional ETS/VIH/SIDA (2008) Un paso adelante en la lucha contra el VIH, SIDA y la Tuberculosis, p. 10.

 

Además, esta cultura inevitablemente hace que los jóvenes tengan miedo a hacer preguntas relacionadas con el sexo y la sexualidad, lo que les impide acceder a información vital sobre una sexualidad segura y cómo protegerse de enfermedades de transmisión sexual.

 

Esta situación puede haber contribuido al hecho de que en 2009, el Comité de América Latina y El Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM) informase de que en los cuatro años anteriores, los casos de VIH/SIDA en El Salvador hubiesen aumentado de manera significativa.156

 

CLADEM también ha explicado que, a la hora de tratar la sexualidad y la reproducción, prevalece una visión mitificada y las medidas para prevenir el VIH hacen hincapié en la abstinencia, la fidelidad mutua y posponer el inicio de las relaciones sexuales, y aún no existe una educación sexual basada en pruebas científicas y basándose en los derechos.157

 

Es más, entre 1984 y octubre de 2008 se registraron 21.908 casos de VIH/SIDA en El Salvador de los cuales 13.487 fueron infecciones de VIH y 8.421 se encontraban en la fase del SIDA. El 32% de los casos eran de jóvenes entre los 20 y 34 años.158 Esto demuestra la importancia de proveer a los jóvenes de suficiente información que les permita protegerse del peligro. Dado que la comunidad LGBTI en El Salvador es la que más riesgo corre de infectarse del VIH, es importante que el Estado incluya y tenga en consideración a la comunidad LGBTI en cualquier política que desarrolle para la prevención del VIH y el SIDA.

 

Sin embargo, también se informa de que han tenido lugar ciertas mejoras al respecto. A través del Programa Nacional para la Prevención, Cuidado y Control de Infecciones de Transmisión Sexual y del VIH/SIDA del Ministerio de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social, y en colaboración con organizaciones y organismos de distintos sectores de la sociedad, el Gobierno ha tomado medidas para encontrar soluciones, estrategias y acciones que respondan a los retos que plantean el VIH/SIDA, en términos de prevención, atención y tratamiento. Estas estrategias han sido trazadas basándose en las recomendaciones del Programa Conjunto de las Naciones Unidas sobre el VIH/SIDA para cumplir con el principio de los “Tres Unos”.159 A nivel nacional, se han lanzado varias recomendaciones educativas para aumentar la concienciación pública sobre el VIH/SIDA, con énfasis en la prevención de infecciones.

 

159 Los Tres Unos supone la implementación de: Un solo marco de acción que provea las bases para una labor coordinada de todos los sectores; Una autoridad Coordinadora nacional para la lucha contra el VIH/SIDA con un amplio mandato multisectorial; y Un Sistema único nacional de monitoreo y Evolución.

 

13. CONCLUSIONES Y RECOMENDACIONES

 

13.1 Conclusiones

 

Este informe ha tratado de fundamentar y resaltar las violaciones sistemáticas y generalizadas de los derechos humanos que se están produciendo contra la población lesbiana, gay, bisexual, transgénero e intersexual (LGBTI) en El Salvador. Ha puesto de relieve la continua gravedad y el nivel de dichas violaciones de derechos humanos contra la comunidad LGBTI.

 

Este informe también ha tratado de resaltar cómo en la práctica, y a pesar del Decreto Presidencial 56 que prohíbe la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual, la discriminación continúa siendo generalizada. Existe también una discriminación oficial y social generalizada en el empleo y en el acceso a la sanidad y a los documentos de identidad, basada en la orientación sexual y la situación de transgénero.

 

Es más, la discriminación contra la comunidad LGBTI está presente en los medios de comunicación, donde las historias relacionadas con personas LGBTI son tratadas de manera sensacionalista o de manera no objetiva o sin sensibilidad. La cobertura mediática incluye generalizaciones y estereotipos incontrolados de las personas LGBTI.

 

Con respecto a los autores de violencia contra las personas LGBTI en El Salvador, se puede mirar a dos sectores principales de la sociedad como causantes de esta lacra. En primer lugar están las maras (bandas callejeras) que a menudo tienen como objetivo a las personas LGBTI y las singularizan. Las maras intimidan y amenazan a la comunidad LGBTI constantemente. En segundo lugar, y a nivel estatal, la policía también es responsable de una lamentable falta de interés y empatía hacia las personas LGBTI. Este informe ha resaltado cómo la policía es reticente a investigar casos que afectan a personas LGBTI o no está dispuesta a tomarse en serio denuncias de este tipo de delitos. Al más alto nivel de la autoridad, las personas LGBTI no están siendo tratadas por igual y, de hecho, están siendo tratadas como ciudadanos de segunda clase por las autoridades que deben proteger a todos los ciudadanos de El Salvador.

 

En la educación y el empleo, las personas LGBTI continúan estando en una desventaja significativa. En el trabajo, las personas LGBTI admiten que esconden su sexualidad por miedo a ser señalados por sus compañeros y superiores. Han admitido que sienten que, de ser revelada su sexualidad, tendrían menos posibilidades de ser ascendidos o de ser asignados a un trabajo de mayor calidad. Aquellos que han hablado abiertamente de su condición de LGBTI denuncian haber sido discriminados continuamente por sus empleadores. En la educación, las personas LGBTI denuncian que se les ha negado la entrada en ciertos colegios, institutos y universidades debido a su condición de LGBTI.160

 

160 (n 9) Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic Report (Informe de la Clínica Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de Berkeley), p. 40.

 

161 Por Ana Montano basándose en la conversación mantenida con líderes religiosos que luchan por la integración de las personas LGBTI en El Salvador.

 

En el ámbito de la asistencia sanitaria, la comunidad LGBTI ha manifestado una falta de sensibilidad por parte de los distintos profesionales de la salud. Los doctores y enfermeras son menos propensos a tomarse su estado de manera seria y a ofrecerles el apoyo y ayuda que suelen necesitar. Esto es especialmente cierto en pacientes con VIH (un número desproporcionadamente alto de los cuales son personas LGBTI) que, a menudo, tienen muchos problemas para conseguir los tratamientos necesarios.

 

Por último, las personas LGBTI en El Salvador sienten que sus derechos fundamentales, como el derecho de expresión y de reunión, suelen ser socavados. Los grupos de apoyo a las personas LGBTI también están en el punto de mira; las marchas y protestas de la comunidad LGBTI son interrumpidas; los permisos para dichas marchas y manifestaciones (incluyendo la marcha del orgullo gay) son denegados sistemáticamente a las organizaciones.161

 

Por lo general, este informe también ha intentado resaltar cómo la discriminación contra personas LGBTI en El Salvador es muy común y crea un clima en el que la violencia, la tortura y los abusos contra la comunidad LGBTI son tolerados y aceptados.

 

También se explica que en el fondo del problema de los derechos de las personas LGBTI se encuentra la percepción que existe de la comunidad LGBTI en El Salvador. Una encuesta de febrero de 2013 sobre este problema arroja algo de luz sobre la opinión inquietante que muchos salvadoreños tienen de la comunidad LGBTI.

 

Las conclusiones de los resultados de la encuesta fueron los siguientes:

 

. Funcionarios admitieron que a menudo se discrimina a las personas LGBTI.

 

. Funcionarios también reconocieron que uno de los principales obstáculos para conseguir un trato equitativo es la falta de un marco legal que prevenga, supervise, prohíba y castigue la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual y la identidad de género.

 

. Las personas LGBTI aún sufren la violación de los derechos humanos más básicos como el derecho a la vida, a la integridad personal, a la seguridad. Mujeres transgénero, hombres homosexuales y travestis son los más afectados.

 

. Existen dificultades específicas para las personas transgénero. En primer lugar, no consiguen un reconocimiento legal a su sexo de elección, lo cual conlleva serias violaciones de sus derechos a la unión civil, a formar una familia, así como de muchos otros derechos civiles.

 

. En la sociedad existen problemas de homofobia, lesbofobia, transfobia, que se traducen en varias manifestaciones de exclusión, marginación y en la violación de los derechos de las personas LGBTI, limitando su acceso a servicios a los que constitucionalmente tienen derecho.162

 

162 Encuesta sobre la Percepción de los Derechos Humanos de la Comunidad LGBT en El Salvador, febrero de 2013.

 

Para mejorar la calidad de vida y la protección contra la discriminación de la comunidad LGBTI, la percepción y la opinión que se tienen de la comunidad LGBTI deben cambiar. Es evidente que la educación está en el fondo de la cuestión. Los colegios deberían tratar más las cuestiones LGBTI con sus alumnos, subrayando la importancia del respeto hacia aquellos que son diferentes. Los funcionarios, la policía, los profesionales de la sanidad y de los medios deberían ser formados en los temas LGBTI y deberían evitar estereotipos dañinos. La manera más eficaz de hacer frente a muchos de estos problemas es, según se sostiene, a través de una legislación sofisticada que consagre específicamente el concepto de discriminación contra las personas LGBTI. Un gobierno, poder judicial y fuerzas policiales fuertes que hagan cumplir dicha legislación enviarían un mensaje poderoso a la población general de que la comunidad LGBTI forma parte de la sociedad salvadoreña y cuyos derechos deben ser protegidos y defendidos.

 

El Salvador ha tomado medidas importantes para mejorar la protección que se ofrece a la comunidad LGBTI. Sin embargo aún queda mucho por hacer para asegurar que las iniciativas legislativas son llevadas a cabo y mantenidas.

 

13.2 Recomendaciones

 

Teniendo en cuenta las conclusiones anteriores, se recomienda que el Gobierno de El Salvador:

. Promulgue leyes que prohíban la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual;

 

. Implemente legislación para evitar los estereotipos de las personas LGBTI por parte de los medios;

 

. Se asegure de que las investigaciones de asesinatos de personas LGBTI se llevan a cabo de conformidad con las normas internacionales;163

 

. Invite al Relator Especial de la ONU sobre ejecuciones extrajudiciales, sumarias o arbitrarias a visitar El Salvador;

 

. Implemente procedimientos y legislación que protejan a las personas LGBTI privadas de libertad;

 

. Ratifique el Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención de la ONU contra la Tortura, el cual incluye establecer un mecanismo nacional preventivo, que permita las visitas a los centros de detención por parte de expertos independientes para ayudar a prevenir el maltrato de las personas detenidas;

 

. Invite al Relator Especial de la ONU sobre la tortura y otros tratos o penas crueles, inhumanos o degradantes y al Relator Interamericano sobre personas privadas de libertad a que visiten El Salvador;

 

. Implementar programas en colegios e institutos, que valoren la diversidad en todas sus formas;

 

. Haga cumplir de manera eficaz el código legal y la constitución, los cuales establecen que todas las personas son iguales ante la ley y prohíben la discriminación sin distinción de raza, sexo, discapacidad, idioma o condición social;

 

. Promulgue leyes que permitan que las personas transgénero reciban nuevos certificados de nacimiento y así permitirles el acceso a la sanidad, la vivienda y el empleo;

 

. Promulgue leyes que aseguren prestaciones laborales a las personas LGBTI iguales a las ofrecidas a las personas heterosexuales;

 

. Implemente legislación que garantice el reconocimiento de las relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo;

 

. Asegure que los abogados y defensores de los derechos humanos que representan a las personas LGBTI están protegidos de conformidad con las normas internacionales;164

 

. Implemente la recomendación del Alto Comisionado de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos garantizando que los individuos puedan ejercer sus derechos de libertad de expresión, asociación y reunión pacífica sin peligro ni discriminación basadas en la orientación sexual o identidad de género;165

 

. Implemente la recomendación del Alto Comisionado de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos garantizando que sean llevados a cabo los programas de sensibilización y

 

163 Principios de la ONU relativos a una eficaz prevención e investigación de las ejecuciones extralegales, arbitrarias o sumarias y el Protocolo modelo para la investigación legal de ejecuciones extralegales, arbitrarias y sumarias (Protocolo de Minnesota).

 

164 Estas normas incluyen: Principios Básicos sobre la Función de los Abogados (1990) Adoptados por el Octavo Congreso de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Prevención del Delito y Tratamiento del Delincuente, La Habana, Cuba, 27 de agosto a 7 de septiembre de 1990 y la Declaración de la ONU sobre los Defensores de los Derechos Humanos (adoptada por la Asamblea General de la ONU el 8 de marzo de 1999).

 

165 Leyes y prácticas discriminatorias y actos de violencia cometidos contra personas por su orientación sexual e identidad de género, Informe del Alto Comisionado de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos, 17 de noviembre de 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, apart. 84 (f) formación para la policía, funcionarios de prisiones, guardias fronterizos, oficiales de inmigración y otros agentes del orden;166

 

. Implemente la recomendación del Alto Comisionado de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos garantizando el apoyo a campañas de información pública para luchar contra la homofobia y la transfobia de la gente, así como campañas anti homofobia en los colegios;167

 

. Proporcione formación a autoridades relevantes para garantizar que las personas LGBTI puedan denunciar delitos o discriminación sin miedo al acoso, la estigmatización o las amenazas.

 

. Garantice que dicha formación sea evaluada y se haga un seguimiento de manera adecuada para garantizar que se cumplen todos los objetivos;

 

. Aumente su compromiso con la Unidad para los Derechos de las Personas LGBTI de la Comisión Interamericana.

 

166 Leyes y prácticas discriminatorias y actos de violencia cometidos contra personas por su orientación sexual e identidad de género, Informe del Alto Comisionado de la ONU para los Derechos Humanos, 17 de noviembre de 2011, UN Doc A/HRC/19/41, apart. 84 (h).

 

167 Ibid.

 

Agradecimientos

 

Los autores están muy agradecidos a Linton Harper, Gisela Quevedo, Kathryn Greenman y Ana Montano, Directora Ejecutiva de Asistencia Legal Para la Diversidad Sexual-El Salvador (‘ALDES’) por su contribución.